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Our Verdict

It’s too early to say which tablet is the best, as we still need to test performance, battery life and camera quality among other things. It’s clear that the Tab S 10.5 is a strong rival to the iPad Air, but for those who own other Apple products the iPad Air may remain the obvious choice.

So Samsung has announced its latest Android tablet at its Galaxy Premiere event, the Galaxy Tab S 10.5. How does the new tablet shape up against the iPad Air? We find out in our Galaxy Tab S 10.5 vs iPad Air comparison review. Also see our Samsung Galaxy Tab S 8.4 and Samsung Galaxy Tab S 10.5 hands-on reviews, and our Samsung Galaxy Tab S 8.4 vs iPad mini 2 comparison review.

NOTE: We’ve had only a limited amount of hands-on time with the Galaxy Tab S 10.5, so we can’t yet provide a complete comparison of these two tablets. Treat this review as our initial thoughts, which we’ll update as soon as we’ve had time to properly test the newcomer’s performance – including its battery life.

Galaxy Tab S 10.5 vs iPad Air: price and UK availability

The iPad Air starts (as every 9.7in iPad so far has) at £399. That’s for the 16GB Wi-Fi only version, and don’t forget that you don’t get built-in GPS unless you buy a 4G/LTE model, which costs £100 more than the equivalent Wi-Fi only version.

The Galaxy Tab S 10.5 also starts at £399, which is for the 16GB Wi-Fi only version, but this does have built-in GPS, regardless of whether you buy the LTE model or not. We’re led to believe LTE models will be £100 more expensive than the Wi-Fi-only equivalent. The Tab S also has a few other tricks, which we’ll get to now. Also see: 25 best tablets of 2014.

The Tab S will go on sale in the UK on July 4th.

Galaxy Tab S 10.5 vs iPad Air: design and build

Samsung hasn’t deviated too much from previous Galaxy Tab design, but it’s impressive how thin the Tab S is. Samsung claims 6.6mm, while the iPad Air is thicker at 7.5mm.

The Tab S 10.5 weighs 465g, with a couple extra if you go for the LTE version. That’s the same at the iPad Air at 469g, and we very much doubt anyone will notice the extra 9g for the LTE version.

You get a choice of ‘Dazzling White’ or ‘Titanium Bronze’, and the iPad comes in Silver or Space Grey.

The Tab S has a physical home button and two touch-sensitive buttons, with stereo speakers mounted on the side. The rear is made from dimpled plastic, which is noticeably inferior to the iPad’s aluminium. We thought the Bronze version looked more upmarket than white, and both look less plasticky than the Galaxy S5.

Galaxy Tab S 10.5 vs iPad Air: display

This is where things get interesting, as Samsung is extremely proud of the Tab S’s 10.5in screen. It uses Super AMOLED technology, and has a resolution of 2560 x 1600 (WQVGA). A pixel density of 280ppi means that everything looks nice and crisp, and the 16:10 aspect ratio is normal for an Android tablet. See also:  Best Android tablets: here’s where we bring to you the 22 best Android tablets in the UK right now.

An adaptive display mode aims to adjust the display’s gamma, saturation and sharpness depending on the content, or you can select which mode you want to use.

The iPad Air has the usual 4:3 aspect ratio and a resolution of 2048 x 1536 pixels – that’s 264ppi. It’s a 9.7in IPS panel and is a really great screen.

In terms of numbers, the Tab S wins, but whether that extra screen real-estate and those pixels make it a better tablet is debatable. On the one hand, yes, a bigger screen is better for some things, but on the other, the iPad Air is just that bit smaller.

Samsung has done well, though, to keep the Tab S’s overall dimensions down – it’s a desirable tablet.

Galaxy Tab S 10.5 vs iPad Air:  processor and hardware

The Tab S 10.5 uses Samsung’s Exynos 5 Octa-core processor, or a Qualcomm Snapdragon 800 depending on where in the world you buy it. There’s 3GB of RAM. Storage-wise, it’s either 16 or 32GB, but with the option of expanding via microSD up to 128GB.

The iPad Air has Apple’s A7 chip, but Apple doesn’t quote clock speeds or RAM. Storage options range from 16 to 128GB, and there’s no changing the storage once you’ve purchased.

The Tab S has an IR blaster and fingerprint scanner – both taken from the Galaxy S5 – and both features which the iPad lacks.

Another win over the iPad is support for 802.11ac Wi-Fi (the Air has dual-band 802.11n), but there’s no NFC.

Galaxy Tab S 10.5 vs iPad Air: cameras

The Galaxy Tab S 10.5 has an 8Mp rear facing camera with an LED flash and a 2.1Mp front facing camera.

Meanwhile, the iPad Air has a 5Mp rear camera (capable of 1080p video) and a 1.2Mp front-facing 720p webcam.

It’s fairly safe to say that the Tab S wins here. The iPad also lacks the slo-mo effect which was bestowed only on the iPhone 5S.

Galaxy Tab S 10.5 vs iPad Air: Software

The Galaxy Tab S 10.5 runs Android 4.4.2 KitKat with Samsung’s latest TouchWiz software. It looks just the Galaxy S5 interface since it uses the same icons, widgets and drop down notification bar.

The iPad Air runs iOS 7 (soon to be iOS 8). The winner here is down to personal preference of course.

Galaxy Tab S 10.5 vs iPad Air: bottom line

It’s too early to say which tablet is the best, as we still need to test performance, battery life and camera quality among other things.

It’s clear that the Tab S 10.5 is a strong rival to the iPad Air, but for those who own other Apple products the iPad Air may remain the obvious choice.

Specs Samsung Galaxy Tab S 10.5: Specs

Android OS 4.4.2 (KitKat)

10.5in Super AMOLED capacitive touchscreen, 2560 x 1600 pixels, 288 ppi

Exynos Octa-core processor

microSD, up to 128 GB

16/32 GB internal storage

3 GB RAM

GPRS

802.11 a/b/g/n/ac, Wi-Fi Direct, dual-band, DLNA

Bluetooth 4.0 LE with A2DP

IR Blaster

Fingerprint scanner

GPS

microUSB v2.0 (MHL 2.1)

stereo speakers

3.5mm jack

8 Mp, 3264 x 2448 pixels, 1080p@30fps

2.1 Mp front camera

Non-removable Li-Po 7900 mAh battery

247 x 177 x 6.6 mm

465 g

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Root Samsung Galaxy Tab S 10.5 Lte Sm

  WARNING!

Warranty may be void of your device if you follow the procedures given on this page.

You only are responsible for your device. We won’t be liable if any damage occurs to your device and/or its components.

  GUIDE: ROOT SAMSUNG GALAXY TAB S 10.5 LTE SM-T805W

Before you begin with the instructions below, make sure your android device is adequately charged — at least 50% battery of the device.

  STEP 0: CHECK DEVICE MODEL NO.

Do not use the procedures discussed here on any other variants of Galaxy Tab S or any other device of Samsung or any other company. You have been warned!

  STEP 1: BACKUP YOUR DEVICE

Back up important data and stuff before you start playing around here as there are chances you might lose your apps and app-data (app settings, game progress, etc.), and in rare case, files on the internal memory, too.

For help on Backup and Restore, check out our exclusive page on that linked right below.

► ANDROID BACK UP AND RESTORE GUIDE: APPS AND TIPS

  STEP 2: INSTALL LATEST DRIVER

You must have proper and working driver installed on your windows computer to be able to successfully root your Samsung Galaxy Tab S 10.5 LTE SM-T805W.

In case you’re not sure, follow the link below for a definitive guide for installing driver for your Samsung device on your computer.

► SAMSUNG DEVICES DRIVERS INSTALLATION GUIDE

   STEP 3: INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS

  DOWNLOADS

Download the CF Auto Root file given below and transfer it to a separate folder on your computer (just to keep things tidy, that is).

  CF AUTO ROOT FILE   STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE

Important Note: Backup important files stored on internal SD card of your device, so that in case a situation arises requiring you to do a factory reset after flashing the CF Auto Root, which might delete internal sd card too, your files will remain safe on PC.

Extract/Unzip the CF-Auto-Root file, CF-Auto-Root-chagallltecan-chagallltevl-smt805w.zip on your computer (using 7-zip free software, preferably). You’ll get the following files:

Odin3-v3.07.exe

Odin3.ini

tmax.dll

zlib.dll

CF-Auto-Root-chagallltecan-chagallltevl-smt805w.tar.md5

Disconnect the Samsung Galaxy Tab S 10.5 LTE from PC if it is connected.

Boot your Samsung Galaxy Tab S 10.5 LTE into Download Mode:

Power off your phone first and wait for 6-7 seconds after display is off.

Press and hold these 3 buttons together until you see Warning! screen: Volume Down + Power + Home.

If you don’t get the Added! message, here are some troubleshooting tips:

Make sure you have installed driver for Samsung Galaxy Tab S 10.5 LTE as said above in ‘Before you begin..’ section.

If you have already installed driver, then uninstall them and reinstall back.

Connect using a different USB port on your PC.

Try a different USB cable. The original cable that came with your phone should work best, if not, try any other cable that’s new and of good quality.

Reboot your phone and PC and then try again.

Load the firmware file (extracted in Step 1) into Odin as instructed below:

Now in the Option section of Odin, make sure that Re-Partition box is unchecked. (Auto Reboot and F. Reset Time boxes remain checked, while all other boxes remain unchecked.)

Double check the above two steps. (Step 6 and Step 7)

If you see FAIL message instead of the PASS in Odin’s top left box, that’s a problem. Try this now: disconnect your Samsung Galaxy Tab S 10.5 LTE from PC, close Odin, remove phone’s battery and put it back inside in 3-4 seconds, open Odin and then repeat from Step 2 of this guide again.

Also, If device is Stuck at setup connection or on any other process, then too, try this: disconnect your Samsung Galaxy Tab S 10.5 LTE from PC, close Odin, remove phone’s battery and put it back inside in 3-4 seconds, open Odin and then repeat from Step 2 of this guide again.

NOTE: It may happen that your phone doesn’t automatically boot into recovery and root your phone. In that case follow the following above procedure except that in Step 7, Auto Reboot option is un-checked and then the instructions below:

Pull out the battery and re-insert it.

Boot your Samsung Galaxy Tab S 10.5 LTE into Recovery Mode: Press and hold these 3 buttons together: Volume Up + Power + Home.

Now, this will start the rooting process and will reboot the phone automatically when the process is done.

FEEDBACK US!

It was easy to root your Samsung Galaxy Tab S 10.5 LTE with CF Auto Root Tool, right?  Let us know how you plan to use root privileges on your Samsung Galaxy Tab S 10.5 LTE.

Your suggestions and queries, if any, are most welcomed!

Samsung Galaxy Tab S3 Review

The best Android tablets

Samsung Chromebook Pro review

Samsung Galaxy Tab S4 review: This is not a laptop

Samsung just recently announced its latest convertible-styled Chromebooks, which now offer support for full blown Android apps – opening a gate that was once closed to them, so it’s especially intriguing how things have turned out. Now that by itself should make anyone question Samsung’s decision to launch its new Galaxy Tab S3, which comes almost two years after its predecessor. In that time, we’ve seen a radical shift in how consumers perceive tablets.

The Tab S3 is competing against other Windows 10 tablets and convertibles in the same price bracket, as well as these cheap Chromebooks and Apple’s iPad Pro tablets. So, do we really need another high-end Android tablet? Find out in our full Samsung Galaxy Tab S3 review!

The biggest change to the display, however, is that it now features high dynamic range – that fancy HDR tech allows it to adjust details, contrast, and color saturation to give videos more of that cinematic vividness. From what we saw in our demo time during MWC 2023, it looked really great in how the contrast in the shadows were adjusted to draw out more details in the scene. However, it’s something you’ll witness with content produced in HDR – so existing videos without HDR won’t necessarily see improvements.

The quad speakers deliver crisp-sounding audio perfect for videos

That being said, there’s no arguing that the Tab S3 is remarkable for media consumption, since it’s been bred for that purpose. In complementing the HDR-enabled display, Samsung pairs the experience with quad speakers; two sets of speakers positioned on both edges of the tablet in landscape. They’re tuned by AKG by Harman, delivering crisp-sounding audio perfect for videos – giving it the necessary stereo effect. But despite reaching a top output of 75.4 dB, it doesn’t sound more potent than the speakers in the iPad Pro.

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Indeed, the Tab S3 handles most of the basic functions of a tablet, but it still stumbles when trying to juggle around more processor-intensive stuff. We see it happen when using Nougat’s baked-in side-by-side multitasking, as there are still some instances when it freezes momentarily. Most actions result in fluid movements, like surfing the web or using the S Pen in a painting app, but there are still times when hiccups do occur with the performance. It’s not frequent, thankfully, but that does make us wonder if it’s the software that’s the culprit.

The benchmark tests reveal it’s very much a powerhouse, in the elite class as you’d expect, rivaling the scores achieved by today’s top-end smartphones. One area that Samsung places a lot of emphasis on is gaming, thanks in part to the Vulkan graphics API engine – allowing it to deliver a solid gaming experience. The emphasis on gaming is especially noticeable in Samsung’s Game Launcher, which dishes up tools that allow gamers to do things like record their footage; without impacting its graphics processing performance in the process.

Hardware

Aside from a few aesthetic changes to the design of the tablet, such as its quad speakers, everything else is pretty much in its usual position. Just like before, the power button and volume keys are located along the right edge of the tablet, along with the microSD card slot. Around the bottom, we have a 3.5 mm headphone jack with the newer USB Type-C connection port, which is positioned offset from the center.

Battery

Samsung has increased the battery capacity to a 6,000 mAh cell, up from its predecessor capacity of 5,870 mAh. That’s a very miniscule upgrade, which results in barely any difference with its battery life performance on a real-world basis. It’s average to say the least, which means that it’s something that would benefit from nightly charges.

Battery life on the Tab S3 is average, to say the least

In our benchmark testing, it topped out at 6 hours and 41 minutes with web surfing – while video watching lasted a minute more at 6 hours and 42 minutes. That’s really nothing worth bragging about, since they’re very average in comparison to other devices we’ve tested. However, it’s at least speedy enough with its recharging via its fast charging technology, taking only a mere 168 minutes to fully charge. That’s impressive given the capacity we’re dealing with, as most smartphones can take nearly the same time to accomplish.

Owners of Samsung’s Galaxy smartphones will be able to continue having access to certain things on their phones while using the Tab S3, thanks in part to Samsung Flow, which allows us to share files wirelessly with the phone – and even respond to message and view notifications. We actually prefer using the old SideSync app, which essentially virtualizes the phone in all of its glory on the tablet. You basically have a window that displays the contents of the phone, so you can do things like send text messages, receive phone calls, and much more!

There still aren’t enough tablet-optimized apps on Android yet

The biggest flaw with the software in our opinion, which is a big deal breaker when you think about it, is how the platform lacks optimized apps meant to be used on tablets. We’re not even talking about third party apps here, just because some of the native apps still don’t support landscape orientation – so it’s an annoyance that forces us to place it in portrait.

Going back to third party apps, this is the disparity that allows the iPad Pro to expose Android’s weakness. There are a handful of popular apps that still don’t properly adjust dynamically in landscape, like Instagram for example. Due to this lack of tablet optimized apps, it really doesn’t help out the tablet’s cause – making it feel like we’re dealing with a very huge phone, as opposed to a tablet. And when you consider that some Chromebooks now offer support for Android apps, it lessens the value of owning an Android tablet nowadays.

Specifications

Samsung Galaxy Tab 2 Student Edition Tablet Goes Official

South Korean company Samsung has just announced the upcoming availability of the Galaxy Tab 2 Student Edition tablet. The slate will be available in a special Student Edition beginning August 19 and for two weeks only. The Special Edition comprises of a Galaxy Tab 2 7.0 tablet in white, a keyboard dock and an USB adapter. The retail value of the sales package is $350 USD, the bundle will be available for purchase for only $249.99 USD until September 1. As the name suggests, the tablet is aimed at students. With the accessories included in the sales package and the pre-loaded Polaris Office, the tablet is a perfect tool for typing reports or creating presentations. Furthermore, the Galaxy Tab 2’s multimedia features will surely meet every user’s needs. Software-wise, the bundle also includes some educational apps, which can be downloaded via Google Play store. The Galaxy Tab 2 Student Edition is powered by Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich operating system and packs a dual core processor clocked at 1 GHz. In addition, the tablet sports a 7-inch capacitive touchscreen display that supports 1024 x 600 pixels resolution, 1GB of RAM and 8GB of internal memory. Unfortunately, the slate lacks microSD card slot for memory expansion. Keep in mind that the bundle will be available while supplies last, from August 19 through September 1, through Best Buy, Amazon, Tiger Direct, Costco and Fry’s. “The education market is a significant priority for Samsung, and we are very pleased to deliver a bundle that is sure to be appealing to just about any student at a very competitive price point. A busy student can achieve a PC-like setup in the dorm room, yet still pop the GALAXY Tab 2 out of the dock and slip it into a pocket for usage while on the go. It truly is the smarter way to learn,” said Travis Merrill, Director of Marketing, GALAXY Tab, Samsung Electronics America.

South Korean company Samsung has just announced the upcoming availability of the Galaxy Tab 2 Student Edition tablet. The slate will be available in a special Student Edition beginning August 19 and for two weeks only. The Special Edition comprises of a Galaxy Tab 2 7.0 tablet in white, a keyboard dock and an USB adapter. The retail value of the sales package is $350 USD, the bundle will be available for purchase for only $249.99 USD until September 1. As the name suggests, the tablet is aimed at students. With the accessories included in the sales package and the pre-loaded Polaris Office, the tablet is a perfect tool for typing reports or creating presentations. Furthermore, the Galaxy Tab 2’s multimedia features will surely meet every user’s needs. Software-wise, the bundle also includes some educational apps, which can be downloaded via Google Play store. The Galaxy Tab 2 Student Edition is powered by Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich operating system and packs a dual core processor clocked at 1 GHz. In addition, the tablet sports a 7-inch capacitive touchscreen display that supports 1024 x 600 pixels resolution, 1GB of RAM and 8GB of internal memory. Unfortunately, the slate lacks microSD card slot for memory expansion. Keep in mind that the bundle will be available while supplies last, from August 19 through September 1, through Best Buy, Amazon, Tiger Direct, Costco and Fry’s. “The education market is a significant priority for Samsung, and we are very pleased to deliver a bundle that is sure to be appealing to just about any student at a very competitive price point. A busy student can achieve a PC-like setup in the dorm room, yet still pop the GALAXY Tab 2 out of the dock and slip it into a pocket for usage while on the go. It truly is the smarter way to learn,” said Travis Merrill, Director of Marketing, GALAXY Tab, Samsung Electronics America.

Ipad Air Vs Xperia Z2 Tablet Comparison Review

Pros

Cons

Our Verdict

Ultimately it is a matter of personal preference. Both these tablets stand head and shoulders above the rest of the 10in tablet world. They are thin and light, well made, designed and built. They offer great displays and excellent performance, decent cameras and so on. and they are priced the same. The main difference is that the iPad Air runs iOS7 and the Xperia Z2 Tablet runs Google’s Android OS. Both have their supporters – which one are you?

The iPad no longer has the tablet market to itself. As 7in Androids such as the  Nexus 7 and  Tesco Hudl offer cheaper but acceptable alternatives to the iPad mini, market share declines even as tablet sales go up. But the iPad Air remains the king of the 10in tablet in the premium space… until now. Sony’s Xperia Z2 Tablet changes things.

This is a premium tablet priced to match the iPad Air. And it doesn’t look out of place in such rarified company. the Xperia Z2 Tablet is thinner and lighter than the iPad Air, appears to be a better performer, and is waterproof and dustproof. So should you choose the Xperia Z2 Tablet over the iPad Air? Read our iPad Air vs Xperia Z2 Tablet comparison to find out.

For more on both read our individual reviews: Sony Xperia Z2 Tablet review: slim, light, powerful Android tablet is best iPad Air alternative and iPad Air review – latest iPad is great, but is the iPad still the best tablet? For a wider view of the tablet market, read: best tablets of 2014.

iPad Air vs Xperia Z2 Tablet comparison: UK price

The Sony Xperia Z2 Tablet and the iPad Air both retail with a starting price of £399 for the 16GB WiFi-only model. In the case of the Xperia Z2 Tablet this scales up to £449 for the 32GB WiFi only model, and £499 for the 16GB LTE model. There’s no 32GB tablet with cellular connectivity, or anything with bigger storage.

The 32GB Wi-Fi iPad Air costs £30 more at £479. The 16GB LTE Sony Xperia Z2 Tablet costs the same as Apple’s equivalent iPad. Apple does offer a 32GB cellular model, at £579. Other options include 64GB and 128GB Wi-Fi only- and cellular iPad Airs. These range from £559 for the 64GB Wi-Fi iPad, up to £739 for a 128GB Wi-Fi and cellular iPad Air.

So there is more variety in the iPad Air range, but if you want a 32GB Wi-Fi-only tablet the Xperia Z2 Tablet is cheaper. One other thing to consider: a quick online search suggests that if you shop around you can get the Xperia Z2 Tablet cheaper than you can the iPad Air. But it’s marginal. Price is not a key differential when considering whether to buy the iPad air or Xperia Z2 Tablet. (See also: best Android tablets of 2014.)

iPad Air vs Xperia Z2 Tablet comparison: build quality, design

Let’s look at the Sony, first. Straight out of the box we are smitten by the Xperia Z2 Tablet. It is the thinnest and lightest 10in tablet you can buy – noticably thinner and lighter than the iPad Air, which is itself famously easy to hold and carry. The Wi-Fi Xperia Z2 Tablet weighs just 426g – or 439g if you opt for the LTE version.

It’s exceptionally thin, too, at just 6.4mm. Again, that’s thinner than the iPad Air (and any other 7in or 10in tablet you can name).

And it matters, not just for reasons of tablet oneupmanship. Holding the Xperia Z2 Tablet feels great, despite the large, 10.1in display, and for lengthy periods of time in standing, sitting and lying positions. Previously we have preferred 7in tablets such as the Nexus 7 or iPad mini, simply because the bigger tablets feel to bulky to hold when watching movies or reading books. But you could spend hours using the Xperia Z2 Tablet without wrist-strain, even when reading in bed. That’s a big win.

It doesn’t, of course, solve the problem of having to carry your 10in tab in a bag where a Kindle-sized 7-incher can slip into a coat pocket – but the trade off of larger screen to weight and bulk feels like a deal worth making with the Xperia Z2.

And you can just sling this tablet into a bag, too. The Xperia Z2 Tablet is waterproof and dust resistant. It’s built to last and feels so, constructed principally of metal and glass, but with a rubbery outer coat around the back and on the corners. That rear cover provides grip but does get grubby with fingerprints, though.

Beauty is in the eye of the beholder and your views may differ, but we think the Xperia 2 Tablet is a good-looking device, too. It’s a simple, stylish device. A slice of black or white tech sharing the same rounded corners and metal frame as the Sony Xperia Z2 smartphone but – to our eyes at least – looking somewhat smarter for larger scale. Our complaint is functional rather than stylistic, in that the bezel is a little larger than we would like. We presume that this is a trade-off in return for the incredible thinness (not a phrase ever used about your author). (See also: 10 best tablets for children.)

It’s available in black or white. We tested – and prefer – the black Xperia Tablet Z2.

The iPad Air is primarily a portrait-mode tablet in 3:4 aspect ratio, yet one that works well on its side in landscape. Contrast this with successive Google Android tablets that take a 16:9 widescreen, a shape that’s better for video but when used for reading webpages or ebooks in portrait you get an overly tall narrow window.

When we first tried the new iPad Air we though it quite widescreen in appearance, not unlike a 16:9 device. The proportions didn’t look right any more – by slimming the edges but not the sides, the tablet looked too tall, not so aesthetically ‘right’.

Foremost, the iPad Air is about lightness. We tried a 128GB iPad with 4G modem and on the scales this – the heaviest possible version of the iPad Air – does weigh just 478g, and is only 7.5mm thick. If you’ve used any previous full-size iPad, you’ll notice immediately the transformation from that circa-650g weight. But pick up the Xperia Z2 Tablet and you’ll notice further lightness.

In general handling, the iPad Air is very light none the less. Yet we found the shape and feel much less tactile than the shape of the iPad 2, 3 and 4, with their gently curved radiuses at the rear and smooth snag-free edges around the front. The iPad Air has harder, less well finished edges which may add more purchase to the fingers but make it less satisfying to handle.

You will decide which you prefer to look at based on subjective critera. But we prefer the Sony based on comfort when holding it, and it is dust- and waterproof. (See also: 10 best budget tablets of 2014.)

iPad Air vs Xperia Z2 Tablet comparison: display

The design of both of these tablets is of course built around a 10in display. It’s the bit you’ll be looking at, so let’s take a closer look right now.

The Xperia Z2 Tablet in fact sports a full HD 10.1in display. This packs a whopping 1920×1200-pixel resolution, giving it a pixel density of 224ppi. That’s up there with some pretty decent smartphones, but not quite as sharp as the market-leading iPad Air. It’s an IPS display and the aspect ratio is 16:10, so viewing angles are good but there is a little screen space under utilised when watching movies.

Sony tells us that the Xperia Z2’s display has been given a colour boost thanks to TRILUMINOS and Live Colour LED – designed to increase the colour accuracy, depth and gradation. Which is nice.

Of course, all that is so much window dressing. What matters is that we found the Xperia Z2 Tablet’s display to be simply stunning. It displays crisp, vivid colours. Watching TV and movies is great. Photos are faithfully reproduced with great clarity but not too much colour as you sometimes find with OLED displays on smartphones. And text documents are sharp, even when you zoom in.

The Xperia Z2 Tablet’s touchscreen responsive in use, bar the almost imperceptible lag that is found on all Android devices when compared directly with their iOS equivalents. And from our initial roughhouse tests at least it seems reasonably immune to scratching. Our only complaint was that the display was all but impossible to see in natural daylight.

The iPad Air is primarily a portrait-mode tablet in 3:4 aspect ratio, yet one that works well on its side in landscape. When we first tried the new iPad Air we thought it quite widescreen in appearance, not unlike a 16:9 device. The proportions didn’t look right any more – by slimming the edges but not the sides, the tablet looked too tall, not so aesthetically ‘right’.

The iPad Air screen is in essence unchanged since the first iPad with Retina display – a 9.7in capacitive touchscreen using IPS technology which delivers rich, faithful colours and clear viewing from any angle.

Strictly speaking it is a 9.7-inch (diagonal) LED-backlit MultiTouch display. And that IPS display is blessed with fingerprint-resistant oleophobic coating.

That 2048×1536 resolution makes for a pixel density of 264 pixels per inch (ppi). You may find the odd tablet that is sharper, and certainly a few smartphones, but when you look at the iPad Air’s display you see only a vibrant and sharp display. And it is sharper than the Xperia Z2 Tablet’s screen, although both displays show even detailed text in fine detail.

We’re going to call this a draw. The iPad is sharper but smaller, and we prefer the aspect ratio of the Sony tablet. But both are great displays.

iPad Air vs Xperia Z2 Tablet comparison: specification, performance

As you would expect at the premium end of the market the Xperia Z2 Tablet is blessed with a strong specification. It has a Qualcomm Snapdragon 801 quad-core processor clocked at 2.3GHz – the same chip as the superfast Xperia Z2 smartphone. This is a Krait 400 CPU with which you get Adreno 320 graphics. It’s paired with 3GB RAM.

Other key specs include a massive 6000mAh battery, and a MicroSD slot so you can add up to 64GB of storage. Our 16GB model had 11.2GB available to use out of the box.

It all adds up to a beast of a tablet. Despite the thin and light shell the Xperia Z2 Tablet is a snappy performer. We’ll get into synthetic benchmarks in a moment, but the most important thing to say is that you will find the Z2 Tablet fast and responsive. As fast and responsive as any Android device we have used, even when placed under load.

Benchmarks are fun because they give you an idea of where a tablet or smartphone ranks against its rival, but take them with a pinch of salt. They are synthetic test designed to give you a number, not hard-and-fast rankings. None the less, the Xperia Z2 Tablet’s benchmark performance backs up our subjective experience of a superfast tablet – mostly.

The exception was the SunSpider Javascript test from which we got a decent but not amazing average score of 1099ms. Lower is better in this test which measures your browser’s ability to handle Javascript, and the iPad Air blitzes the Xperia Z2 Tablet with a score a little faster than 400ms. We have to say that we found web browsing on the Xperia Z2 tablet a joyous experience, and only occasionally laggy. But this is one to chalk up to the iPad.

We ran a GFXBench test to benchmark graphics performance. In the T-Rex (onscreen) test we got our best ever tablet result of 1,530 frames at 27fps (averaged over three runs). The Xperia Z2 Tablet will chew up and spit out even the most demanding Android games, and beats out the iPad Air which averaged 1,187 and 21fps.

And then there is GeekBench 3. This is a somewhat controversial all-round benchmark as some Android manufacturers have been accused of designing their devices to perform abnormally well in this test. (Allegations they almost all deny, by the way.) So make of this what you will, but the Xperia Z2 Tablet smashed GeekBench 3 to bits in our tests. It returned an average single-core result of 967, a more important multi-core score of 2719. That’s the fastest multi-core result we’ve ever got from a 10in tablet, comparing well with the iPad Air’s 2703 points in multi-core mode; and 1487 points for a single core.

All you can really take from this is the fact that the Xperia Z2 Tablet is a fast and responsive tablet. It really is. But then so is the iPad Air as can be seen by those excellent synthetic benchmark results. It runs an A7 processor clocked at 1.39GHz, paired with 1GB RAM.

We’re a little troubled by the sometimes unsmooth interface. This is a general criticism of iOS 7 but one we didn’t expect to see on the latest iPad with bestest-yet graphics processor.

Most apparent with app zooming, when you open or close an app and return to the home screen, we saw jittery animations. It’s not always apparent, and we suspect many people will probably not notice, let alone be troubled by it. Elsewhere in text scrolling and pinch-to-zoom actions there were no such issues, as free and fluid as ever.

If you trust benchmarks you will say the Xperia Z2 Tablet is the faster performer in most but not all respects. If not, we are happy to report that both the iPad Air and the Xperia Z2 Tablet are at the pinnacle of tablet performance. Both are great in use with only occasional lag.

iPad Air vs Xperia Z2 Tablet comparison: camera

Both also have pretty good cameras, particularly for tablets. Pick up the Xperia Z2 Tablet and you’ll find an 8.1Mp camera around the back. This has autofocus and captures 3264 x 2448 pixel images which look good on the Xperia Z2 Tablet’s display. Additional features include Exmor RS for mobile, which is designed to help users take good-looking shots in any light, as well as geo-tagging, touch focus, face- and smile detection, HDR and a panorama. The rear-facing camera captures 1080p video at 30fps.

Up front there is a 2Mp webcam for selfies and video chat.

The iPad Air has a rear-facing 5Mp iSight camera, with f2.4 aperture. On the front is a 1.2Mp HD webcam. The former takes full-HD video. The front-facing camera is a 720p video camera for FaceTime and Skype. We found night-time Skype calls were more clearly lit than before.

You won’t be buying the iPad Air or the Xperia Z2 Tablet as your main camera. But if you take photos and video with your tablet you won’t be disappointed. Both are solid performers in this respect, no better than they ought to be. You can find more detail in our individual Sony Xperia Z2 Tablet review: slim, light, powerful Android tablet is best iPad Air alternative and iPad Air review – latest iPad is great, but is the iPad still the best tablet? articles.

iPad Air vs Xperia Z2 Tablet comparison: software

This is the classic iOS vs Android battle: in this case iOS7 for the iPad Air vs Android KitKat for the Xperia Z2 Tablet.

Sony’s Xperia Z2 Tablet runs Android 4.4 KitKat, with relatively little customisation. It does have Sony’s user interface over the top of vanilla Android. It’s a stylish customisation that thankfully doesn’t take over the OS in the way that Samsung’s and HTC’s do.

KitKat is Google’s best ever tablet OS. Feature rich, easy to use and good to look at. It offers full access to the Google Play app- and media stores, as well as Sony’s own stores and apps.

You can simply mount the Xperia Z2 Tablet as external storage on your PC, but Sony also provides software to make pairing and synching a little easier.

Flip over to the iPad Air and iOS looks fresh and modern, with features that help keep it on a par with (if not ahead of) Android.

However, iOS 7 still lacks customisation, so anyone hoping for Android-style widgets, or merely the ability to change the default keyboard, will be disappointed.

Apple’s walled-garden approach hasn’t changed, and that’s largely a good thing. You can’t install apps except through the App Store, which means tight security and less piracy.

It’s interesting that Microsoft ditched transparency in Windows 8, since this is a major part of iOS 7. Apple says it helps to orient you, and we can’t help but agree. Overall, iOS 7 is a success.

So should you choose it and the iPad Air rather than the Android-toting Xperia Z2 Tablet? It really is impossible to say. Both are stable and fast, feature-rich operating systems.

You can argue the toss over which offers access to the most tablet-specific apps (it’s iOS), but it is unlikely you will find any major apps missing in either. And although the iTunes media stores are brilliantly easy to use and stocked with the latest tablets, Android offers you access to multiple stores so you can shop around for the best deal.

iPad Air vs Xperia Z2 Tablet comparison:  battery life

We haven’t yet had time to properly test the Xperia Z2 Tablet’s battery life and will update this review when we do. Our early experience of using the Z2 Tablet suggest that it won’t be a problem, despite the killer power specs. That 6000mAh battery cell should help. And, according to the company, there’s also the Battery STAMINA mode, designed to prolong battery life. We’ll test it and get back to you.

But the Xperia Z2 Tablet is unlikely to beat out the iPad Air. Battery life here is exemplary, with Apple assuring around 10 hours continuous use, while we found that occasional but steady use meant it could last the best part of a week between charges.

With the caveat that it may change, for now we give the battery life nod to the iPad Air.

iPad Air vs Xperia Z2 Tablet comparison: which should you buy?

Ultimately it is a matter of personal preference. Both these tablets stand head and shoulders above the rest of the 10in tablet world. They are thin and light, well made, designed and built. They offer great displays and excellent performance, decent cameras and so on. and they are priced the same. The main difference is that the iPad Air runs iOS7 and the Xperia Z2 Tablet runs Google’s Android OS. Both have their supporters – which one are you? Find out more about which tablet to buy in our

Specs Sony Xperia Z2 Tablet: Specs

GSM 850 / 900 / 1800 / 1900

HSDPA 850 / 900 / 1700 / 1900 / 2100 – SGP541, SGP521, SGP551

LTE 700/800/850/900/1700/1800/1900/2100/2600 – SGP521

LTE 850 / 900 / 1700 / 1800 / 1900 / 2100 / 2600 – SGP551

Micro-SIM

266 x 172 x 6.4 mm

439 g

TFT capacitive touchscreen, 16M colours, 1200 x 1920 pixels, 10.1 inches (~224 ppi pixel density), Multitouch

stereo speakers

3.5mm jack

microSD, up to 64 GB

16 GB

3 GB RAM

GPRS

EDGE

HSDPA, 42 Mbps

HSUPA, 5.8 Mbps

LTE, Cat3, 50 Mbps UL, 100 Mbps DL

802.11 a/b/g/n/ac, Wi-Fi Direct, dual-band, DLNA, Wi-Fi hotspot

Bluetooth 4.0 with A2DP

NFC

microUSB v2.0 (MHL 3)

8.1 MP, 3264 x 2448 pixels, 1080p@30fps, HDR

2.2 MP, 1080p@30fps

Android OS, v4.4.2 (KitKat)

Qualcomm MSM8974AB Snapdragon 801, Adreno 330

FM radio with RDS

GPS

Non-removable Li-Po 6000 mAh battery

How To Install Android 2.3.2 On Samsung Galaxy S

Gingerbread — in its semi-official form — has already leaked out for the Galaxy S, running on Android 2.3.2 (not Android 2.3.3, which is the latest version out there). While some Galaxy S variants are yet to get Android 2.2, aka Froyo, it’s strange that Samsung has already got an Android 2.3 ROM ready (in beta). Though, we totally love it that we have a new ROM to play with and boast of that Android 2.3 goodness.

If you want to install Android 2.3.2 on your Galaxy S, here is what you’ll need to do.

Disclaimer: The procedures discussed here are considered risky and we will not be liable for any damage happens to you or your phone, including bricking. So, know that you’re on your own.

Follow these step-by-step directions to install Android 2.3 Gingerbread on your Galaxy S:

Download the leaked Android 2.3.2 ROM from here — named chúng tôi Size: 241 MB approx.

Extract the chúng tôi file to any folder of your choice. You’ll get 3 files:

GT-I9000-MULTI-CSC-OXXJV1.tar.md5,

MODEM_I9000XXJVE.tar.md5 and

CODE_I9000XWJV1_CL31216_REV03_user_mid_noship.tar.md5.

Download the file: chúng tôi from here. Extract it to get these files:

Odin3 v1.7,

s1_odin_20100512.pit (no need to use this file in this tutorial) and

s1_odin_20100803.pit.

Save your data now. To save the whole ROM you’re currently using, install ROM Manager for free from the android market. Open it, Install the clockwork recovery. And then, select Backup ROM, for full backup of all settings and data and apps.

Once finished backing up. Switch Off your Galaxy S. make sure it’s disconnected from PC and connect it only when told.

Now, put it in Download Mode. For that, press these keys together – Volume Down + Power Button + Home Button.

In the PIT box, select the 8.3 pit from the step 3.3. Full name of 8.3 PIT: s1_odin_20100803.pit.

In the PDA box, select this file (from step 2.3) — CODE_I9000XWJV1_CL31216_REV03_user_mid_noship.tar.md5

In the Phone box, select this file (from step 2.2) — MODEM_I9000XXJVE.tar.md5

In the CSC box, select this file (from step 2.1) — GT-I9000-MULTI-CSC-OXXJV1.tar.md5

Make sure all these boxes are ticked (do not keep them unticked) — Re-Partition, Auto Reboot, F. Reset Time.

Now connect your phone (which is in Download Mode since step 6) to computer.

Upon connecting, Odin will show “Added” under the message box.

Now, hit the START button to let the process begin.

When process at Odin finishes your phone will automatically reboot. You can unplug the cable now. That is, disconnect your phone from PC now, when reboot starts.

When your phone has restarted, you are on the Android 2.3 Gingerbread edition of Android. Congrats!

Check out the video below of our Galaxy S running Android 2.3.2. Surprisingly and very sadly, there is no improvement in benchmark score of Linpack — which is still at 14 MFLOPS, same as what we has with Android 2.2.

Update: Special Thanks to Lorbas — He’s the one who leaked the news for us all. If you’re looking for a Android News blog in Polish language, his website — chúng tôi — is the best place for you.

Update 2: We’re about to Root our phone with Android 2.3.2 ROM. So, check with us if you want to know the procedures along with the video. And guess what, Insanity already has a beta ROM running Android 2.3.2 Gingerbread and it’s pre-rooted too. We’ll also give that one touch, so expect some really serious — and fun — stuff to hit this page soon. Real soon.

Update the detailed information about Samsung Galaxy Tab S 10.5 Vs Ipad Air on the Tai-facebook.edu.vn website. We hope the article's content will meet your needs, and we will regularly update the information to provide you with the fastest and most accurate information. Have a great day!