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The inch symbol is denoted by a double prime (i.e. double quotes) whilst the feet symbol is denoted by a prime (i.e. apostrophe). For instance, nine feet five inches can be written or typed as 9’5″ using your keyboard.

In today’s article, you’ll learn how to use some keyboard (or alt code) shortcuts to make or type the Feet and Inch Symbols (text) on the keyboard.

Note: On the standard keyboard, the Inch Symbol is the same as double quotes and an apostrophe respectively. To type the double quotes symbol as the inch symbol, press Shift + ′ (apostrophe), and to type the apostrophe as the feet symbol, just press the apostrophe key.

Now, below will show you more ways to type these symbols (double quotes and an apostrophe) using the keyboard.

To type the Inch Symbol on Keyboard, press Shift + ′ (apostrophe key) simultaneously. And to type the feet symbol, just press once on the apostrophe key. For instance, eight feet four inches will be typed as 8′4″.

The below table contains all the information you need about these Symbols.

Inch Symbol“Feet Symbol‘Inch symbol on keyboard[Shift] + [′] keysFeet Symbol on keyboard[′] key

The above quick guide shows you what the inch and feet symbols are and some useful shortcuts and alt codes on how to type these symbols.

Also, below are some other fun ways you can use to insert these symbols into your work such as Word or Excel documents.

Windows provides several methods for typing symbols on the keyboard.

In this section, I will make available for you five different methods you can use to type or insert the Inch sign on your keyboard.

Without any further ado, let’s get started.

The Inch symbol alt code is 0148. Even though this Symbol has a dedicated key on the keyboard, you can also type it on the keyboard with the Alt code method. To do this, open your Word document and place the insertion pointer where you need to type the symbol. Then press and hold the Alt key whilst typing the Symbol’s Alt code (i.e. 0148) using the numeric keypad.

This method works on Windows only. And your keyboard must also have a numeric keypad.

Also, to type the Inch Symbol in Word, type 0022, then press Alt and X keys simultaneously to convert the code into an Inch Symbol.

Below is a break-Down of the steps you can take to type the Inch sign on your Windows PC:

Place your insertion pointer where you need the symbol.

Press and hold one of the Alt keys on your keyboard.

Whilst holding on to the Alt key, press the Symbol’s alt code (0148). You must use the numeric keypad to type the alt code. If you are using a laptop without the numeric keypad, this method may not work for you. On some laptops, there’s a hidden numeric keypad which you can enable by pressing Fn+NmLk on the keyboard.

Release the Alt key after typing the Alt code to insert the Symbol into your document.

This is how you may type this symbol in Word using the Alt Code method.

The keyboard shortcut for the Inch Symbol is Shift + ′ (apostrophe). To use this shortcut, press the shift and apostrophe keys simultaneously.

Below is a breakdown of the Inch Symbol shortcut on the keyboard:

Place the insertion pointer at the desired location.

Then press Shift+′ (apostrophe).

These are the steps you may use to type the Inch Symbol.

Another easy way to get the Inch symbol on any PC is to use my favorite method: copy and paste.

All you have to do is to copy the symbol from somewhere like a web page, or the character map for windows users, and head over to where you need the symbol (say in Word or Excel), then hit Ctrl+V to paste.

Below is the symbol for you to copy and paste into your Word document. Just select it and press Ctrl+C to copy, switch over to Microsoft Word, place your insertion pointer at the desired location, and press Ctrl+V to paste.

Alternatively, just use the copy button at the beginning of this post.

For windows users, obey the following instructions to copy and paste the Inch  Symbol using the character map dialog box.

Switch to your Microsoft Word or Excel document, place the insertion pointer at the desired location, and press Ctrl+V to paste.

This is how you may use the Character Map dialog to copy and paste any symbol on Windows PC.

Obey the following steps to insert the Inch Symbol in Word using the insert symbol dialog box.

The Symbol dialog box will appear.

Close the dialog.

The symbol will then be inserted exactly where you placed the insertion pointer.

These are the steps you may use to insert the Inch Symbol in Word.

As you can see, there are several different methods you can use to type the Inches and Feet Symbols on the keyboard

Using shortcuts makes the fastest option for this task. Shortcuts are always fast.

Thank you very much for reading this blog.

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Wingtip To Wingtip At 45O Mph! 3O Feet Above The Ground! Sideways!

As Darryl Greenamyer approached the last turn in the final Sport-class race of the 2003 National Championship Air Races in Reno, Nevada, he heard a sound. It was a roar, really–so loud it seemed to come from inside his plane, just behind his head. Greenamyer was flying 40 feet above the ground at something faster than 320 mph. But Rick Vandam was passing him.

Over the course of 38 years, Greenamyer has won nine championships at Reno. There is nothing he hates more than second place.

This was air racing, not auto racing, and so the incursion was happening in an ever-changing three-dimensional space, Vandam coming from slightly below and to the right, on the “outside” of the track. “I couldn’t see him, but I could hear that he was really close,” Greenamyer says. He had blown out his souped-up racing engine in a heat race the day before and had stayed up all night replacing the cylinders with stock parts. And now here he was, hobbled, underpowered, getting passed. The two planes hit the turn. Greenamyer banked hard to the left around a pylon–his plane was almost sideways–looked down, and saw Vandam’s shadow pulling ahead on the outside. “Here goes my second engine,” Greenamyer thought, driving the throttle forward and praying that Vandam wouldn’t be able to turn as tightly (or fly right into him), and that his stock engine would hold. It did. Greenamyer won the Sport class by 1.9 seconds.

War II-era B-29 that hadn’t been flown in 48 years. He is notorious for doing things in and with airplanes that ordinary people wouldn’t even think of, and he has won the fastest division of the world’s fastest motor sport more times than anyone.

fighters such as P-51 Mustangs flying lap speeds of 450 mph within shouting distance of the ground.

And it’s the Unlimited division that Greenamyer has won seven times, the first in 1965 and the last in 1977. His winning plane, a highly modified Grumman F8F-2 Bearcat named Conquest I, weighs 6,000 pounds, has eight feet clipped off its wings, the oversize prop of a Douglas Skyraider and a massive 3,200-hp engine. It now sits enshrined in the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C.

latest creations. In September they will go head to head for the first time ever, each flying small, light, high-tech machines in a division that didn’t exist at Reno until five years ago, a division that threatens to dethrone the mighty Unlimited warbirds in excitement, technology and maybe even speed, and in the process might make the sport of air racing relevant for the first time since the 1930s.

There’s a reason Greenamyer was so incredulous at finding himself in a contested race last year at Reno–and it goes beyond mere hubris. But to understand it requires a bit of history.

cutting-edge sport and technology, and watching it was hip.

Then came World War II, which suspended the sport and accelerated the technological development of aviation in ways no one could have imagined. In 1939 America’s fastest fighters flew little more than 300 mph. Just five years later, Mustangs and Corsairs were hitting speeds nearly 150 mph faster; by war’s end they were the fastest machines on Earth and there were tens of thousands of them out there. Piston and propeller technology, it seemed, had reached its apex. When air racing resumed, its allure was on the wane; airplanes were as familiar as automobiles, and there were no technological boundaries left to be pushed. Then, at Cleveland in 1949, Bill Odom crashed into a house at the end of the course, killing a mother and her child. Air racing was over.

In 1964 a cattle rancher named Bill Stead resurrected the sport over a patch of desert outside Reno. Hardcore working pilots like Greenamyer, then flying for Lockheed, loved to fly fast and to tinker, and their planes of choice were warbirds–not because they were crowd-pleasing icons but because, as surplus World War II junk, they were the fastest and cheapest planes money could buy. Greenamyer’s Bearcat was valued at $8,000; new engines and aviation fuel could be had for next to nothing. He chopped off the wingtips, streamlined the cowling, added a huge prop and cooling system, and dramatically reduced the plane’s weight. Nobody could touch him. Reno grew slowly into an aviation cult, until the ritual packed in 150,000 fans a year. There is simply nothing like a pack of fighters roaring wingtip to wingtip 30 feet off the ground at 450 mph. But with every passing year, the Unlimited field becomes less competitive, with little wingtip-to-wingtip action anymore. The reason is the economics of scarcity.

Today only a handful of Bearcats and Mustangs remain. Of 50,000 Rolls Royce V-12 Merlin engines produced during the war, less than 1,000 are left. A stock Mustang is an antique worth $1 million; chopping it up to win at Reno the way Greenamyer did with his Bearcat could easily cost an extra $500,000, all to create a plane that would race one weekend a year and whose likelihood of crashing or blowing a rare $250,000 engine would increase exponentially the faster it went. And first place grosses you only $160,000.

The numbers tell the story. In 20 years, lap speeds have barely increased. Out of 26 planes in the Unlimited division in 2003, 197 mph separated the first and last place qualifying speeds. Even in the final heat, the speed differential between first and third place was 40 mph. “There are only two or three real Unlimited race planes now,” Sharp says. “The rest are just tweaked-up warbirds whose rich owners want to win trophies for competing. If you own a P-51 Mustang, you don’t want to really race it hard. And it’s all just about horsepower anyway. There hasn’t been any new technology in 40 years.”

“I call it gentlemen’s racing,” Greenamyer says.

furniture magnate, cobbled together a Mustang fuselage and the wings of a Learjet; he died in a fiery crash at Reno in 1999. In Greenamyer’s own shop sits the most revolutionary Unlimited plane of all: Shockwave, sporting a custom fuselage, the stubby outer wing panels of a World War II-era Sea Fury, the tail of an F-86 jet and a massive 28-cylinder Pratt and Whitney R-4360 built to power long-distance bombers and capable of pouring out 5,000 hp. But Shockwave has been left unfinished for more than 15 years. Finding the million dollars necessary to put it all together has proved impossible, given that the plane would bring home just 15 percent of that figure if it won.

Formula One the size of a telephone booth? Auto racing sells cars: “Race on Sunday, buy on Monday.” But no Joe Six-pack in the stands at Reno can go out and buy any of those planes.

Meanwhile, though, a quiet aviation revolution has taken place. Throughout the 1940s, ’50s and ’60s, corporate giants such as Cessna and Beech built general aviation planes to rigorous FAA standards, and they all looked pretty much alike. There was one loophole to the FAA regulations, however: so-called homebuilt aircraft, at least 51 percent constructed by their owners for research or recreation. Into the early 1970s, homebuilts were sold mostly as time-consuming, complex plans for airplanes that were difficult to make and didn’t fly very well when finished.

factory-built plane and won.

Darryl Greenamyer was there that year, watching. He was in the market for a new plane to just fly around in, so he wandered into Lancair’s display tent, where its newest plane, a fast two-seater called Legacy, was on display. “I’m interested in buying one,” he said. Sure, the saleswoman said, put your name on the waiting list. Never one to wait, Greenamyer offered another suggestion: “What if I race it?”

“Who are you?” asked the woman.

The rest is air-racing legend. Lancair allowed Greenamyer to buy kit number one in 2000, and today the plane sits in his San Clemente shop in the midst of yet another round of modifications to make it go faster. (So far, the only limiting factor in the Sport class is a maximum engine size of 650 cubic inches and a requirement that at least five kits be sold for each model entered.) Lancair had no idea what it was getting into when it started cavorting with Greenamyer. Back in his Unlimited days, the old Bearcat had been so radically modified that it could barely stay in the air; the cockpit temperatures reached 200

by Darryl Greenamyer; Jon Sharp

Left: Greenamyer in 1966, days before winning the Unlimited class for the third time in the then three-year history of the event. Right: Sharp and Nemesis in 1998, after he bested his own speed record by 6.5 mph.

New Breeds

Greenamyer in a heavily modified Lancair Legacy shortly after winning last year’s Sport Gold race.

New Breeds

Sharp and the Nemesis NXT, in Mojave, California, earlier this year.

Reno 911

After decades of decline, relatively cheap and fast kit planes could resurrect pylon racing, still seen every September in Reno.

Reno 911

Wayne Cartwright in Six Shooter takes a typical racing line at last year’s event–low, fast and tight.

How To Type Russian Letters On English Keyboard (In Ms Word)

There are a few clean tips and tricks in this article that will help you type Russian letters quickly and efficiently on any computer platform, including desktops, laptops, and even mobile devices.

Some keyboards are made in Russian and allow you to type these Russian characters more quickly and comfortably.

However, if you don’t have access to such a special Russian keyboard, the techniques in this article can be very helpful.

Without further ado, let’s get started.

There are several methods for typing or inserting Russian characters into Microsoft Word.

Because these characters are not readily available on the keyboard, the simplest way to type them on Word is to use their alt codes.

In this section, I’ll show you how to use alt codes to type Russian letters on an English keyboard.

Each Russian character has an alt code that you can use to type it in Microsoft Word.

You’ll quickly learn the alt code for all the Russian characters. For the time being, let’s focus on the steps.

To type Russian letters in MS Word, follow these steps:

First and foremost, get the alt code for the Russian letters you intend to type. These alt codes are listed just below these instructions.

Open your Microsoft Word document and move the insertion pointer to the location where you want to type the Russian characters.

Turn on your Num Lock. Press Fn+NmLk to turn on Num Lock on laptops without the numeric keypad.

Hold down the Alt key on your keyboard.

Whilst still holding on to the Alt key, press the Russian alt code.

For example, to type ア, press and hold the Alt key, then type the alt code 12450 on the numeric keypad.

Now release the Alt key.

You should see the Russian letter inserted as soon as you release the Alt key.

Related: How to type Japanese Characters

Below are the alt codes for the various Russian Characters.

Uppercase Russian Letters/Characters

Character NameCharacterAlt CodeCYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER AАAlt + 1040CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER BEБAlt + 1041CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER VEВAlt + 1042CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER GHEГAlt + 1043CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER DEДAlt + 1044CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER IEЕAlt + 1045CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER ZHEЖAlt + 1046CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER ZEЗAlt + 1047CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER IИAlt + 1048CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER SHORT IЙAlt + 1049CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER KAКAlt + 1050CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER ELЛAlt + 1051CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER EMМAlt + 1052CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER ENНAlt + 1053CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER OОAlt + 1054CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER PEПAlt + 1055CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER ERРAlt + 1056CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER ESСAlt + 1057CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER TEТAlt + 1058CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER UУAlt + 1059CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER EFФAlt + 1060CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER HAХAlt + 1061CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER TSEЦAlt + 1062CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER CHEЧAlt + 1063CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER SHAШAlt + 1064CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER SHCHAЩAlt + 1065CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER HARD SIGNЪAlt + 1066CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER YERUЫAlt + 1067CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER SOFT SIGNЬAlt + 1068CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER EЭAlt + 1069CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER YUЮAlt + 1070CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER YAЯAlt + 1071

Lowercase Russian Letters/Characters

Character NameCharacterAlt CodeCYRILLIC SMALL LETTER AаAlt + 1072CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER BEбAlt + 1073CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER VEвAlt + 1074CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER GHEгAlt + 1075CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER DEдAlt + 1076CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER IEеAlt + 1077CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER ZHEжAlt + 1078CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER ZEзAlt + 1079CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER IиAlt + 1080CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER SHORT IйAlt + 1081CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER KAкAlt + 1082CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER ELлAlt + 1083CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER EMмAlt + 1084CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER ENнAlt + 1085CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER OоAlt + 1086CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER PEпAlt + 1087CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER ERрAlt + 1088CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER ESсAlt + 1089CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER TEтAlt + 1090CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER UуAlt + 1091CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER EFфAlt + 1092CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER HAхAlt + 1093CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER TSEцAlt + 1094CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER CHEчAlt + 1095CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER SHAшAlt + 1096CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER SHCHAщAlt + 1097CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER HARD SIGNъAlt + 1098CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER YERUыAlt + 1099CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER SOFT SIGNьAlt + 1100CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER EэAlt + 1101CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER YUюAlt + 1102CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER YAяAlt + 1103

Additional Russian Letters and Symbols

Character NameCharacterAlt CodeCYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER OMEGAѠAlt + 1120CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER OMEGAѡAlt + 1121CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER YATѢAlt + 1122CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER YATѣAlt + 1123CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER IOTIFIED EѤAlt + 1124CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER IOTIFIED EѥAlt + 1125CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER LITTLE YUSѦAlt + 1126CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER LITTLE YUSѧAlt + 1127CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER IOTIFIED LITTLE YUSѨAlt + 1128CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER IOTIFIED LITTLE YUSѩAlt + 1129CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER BIG YUSѪAlt + 1130CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER BIG YUSѫAlt + 1131CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER IOTIFIED BIG YUSѬAlt + 1132CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER IOTIFIED BIG YUSѭAlt + 1133CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER KSIѮAlt + 1134CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER KSIѯAlt + 1135CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER PSIѰAlt + 1136CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER PSIѱAlt + 1137CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER FITAѲAlt + 1138CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER FITAѳAlt + 1139CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER IZHITSAѴAlt + 1140CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER IZHITSAѵAlt + 1141CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER IZHITSA WITH DOUBLE GRAVE ACCENTѶAlt + 1142CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER IZHITSA WITH DOUBLE GRAVE ACCENTѷAlt + 1143CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER UKѸAlt + 1144CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER UKѹAlt + 1145CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER ROUND OMEGAѺAlt + 1146CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER ROUND OMEGAѻAlt + 1147CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER OMEGA WITH TITLOѼAlt + 1148CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER OMEGA WITH TITLOѽAlt + 1149CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER OTѾAlt + 1150CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER OTѿAlt + 1151CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER KOPPAҀAlt + 1152CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER KOPPAҁAlt + 1153CYRILLIC THOUSANDS SIGN҂Alt + 1154COMBINING CYRILLIC TITLOа҃Alt + 1155COMBINING CYRILLIC PALATALIZATIONа҄Alt + 1156COMBINING CYRILLIC DASIA PNEUMATAа҅Alt + 1157COMBINING CYRILLIC PSILI PNEUMATAа҆Alt + 1158COMBINING CYRILLIC HUNDRED THOUSANDS SIGN҈аAlt + 1160COMBINING CYRILLIC MILLIONS SIGN҉аAlt + 1161CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER SEMISOFT SIGNҌAlt + 1164CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER SEMISOFT SIGNҍAlt + 1165CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER ER WITH TICKҎAlt + 1166CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER ER WITH TICKҏAlt + 1167CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER GHE WITH UPTURNҐAlt + 1168CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER GHE WITH UPTURNґAlt + 1169CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER GHE WITH STROKEҒAlt + 1170CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER GHE WITH STROKEғAlt + 1171CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER GHE WITH MIDDLE HOOKҔAlt + 1172CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER GHE WITH MIDDLE HOOKҕAlt + 1173CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER ZHE WITH DESCENDERҖAlt + 1174CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER ZHE WITH DESCENDERҗAlt + 1175CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER ZE WITH DESCENDERҘAlt + 1176CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER ZE WITH DESCENDERҙAlt + 1177CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER KA WITH DESCENDERҚAlt + 1178CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER KA WITH DESCENDERқAlt + 1179CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER KA WITH VERTICAL STROKEҜAlt + 1180CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER KA WITH VERTICAL STROKEҝAlt + 1181CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER KA WITH STROKEҞAlt + 1182CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER KA WITH STROKEҟAlt + 1183CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER BASHKIR KAҠAlt + 1184CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER BASHKIR KAҡAlt + 1185CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER EN WITH DESCENDERҢAlt + 1186CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER EN WITH DESCENDERңAlt + 1187CYRILLIC CAPITAL LIGATURE EN GHEҤAlt + 1188CYRILLIC SMALL LIGATURE EN GHEҥAlt + 1189CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER PE WITH MIDDLE HOOK (Abkhasian)ҦAlt + 1190CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER PE WITH MIDDLE HOOK (Abkhasian)ҧAlt + 1191CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER ABKHASIAN HAҨAlt + 1192CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER ABKHASIAN HAҩAlt + 1193CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER ES WITH DESCENDERҪAlt + 1194CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER ES WITH DESCENDERҫAlt + 1195CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER TE WITH DESCENDERҬAlt + 1196CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER TE WITH DESCENDERҭAlt + 1197CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER STRAIGHT UҮAlt + 1198CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER STRAIGHT UүAlt + 1199CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER STRAIGHT U WITH STROKEҰAlt + 1200CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER STRAIGHT U WITH STROKEұAlt + 1201CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER HA WITH DESCENDERҲAlt + 1202CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER HA WITH DESCENDERҳAlt + 1203CYRILLIC CAPITAL LIGATURE TE TSE (Abkhasian)ҴAlt + 1204CYRILLIC SMALL LIGATURE TE TSE (Abkhasian)ҵAlt + 1205CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER CHE WITH DESCENDERҶAlt + 1206CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER CHE WITH DESCENDERҷAlt + 1207CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER CHE WITH VERTICAL STROKEҸAlt + 1208CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER CHE WITH VERTICAL STROKEҹAlt + 1209CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER SHHAҺAlt + 1210CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER SHHAһAlt + 1211CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER ABKHASIAN CHEҼAlt + 1212CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER ABKHASIAN CHEҽAlt + 1213CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER ABKHASIAN CHE WITH DESCENDERҾAlt + 1214CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER ABKHASIAN CHE WITH DESCENDERҿAlt + 1215CYRILLIC LETTER PALOCHKAӀAlt + 1216CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER ZHE WITH BREVEӁAlt + 1217CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER ZHE WITH BREVEӂAlt + 1218CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER KA WITH HOOKӃAlt + 1219CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER KA WITH HOOKӄAlt + 1220CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER EN WITH HOOKӇAlt + 1223CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER EN WITH HOOKӈAlt + 1224CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER KHAKASSIAN CHEӋAlt + 1227CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER KHAKASSIAN CHEӌAlt + 1228CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER A WITH BREVEӐAlt + 1232CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER A WITH BREVEӑAlt + 1233CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER A WITH DIAERESISӒAlt + 1234CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER A WITH DIAERESISӓAlt + 1235CYRILLIC CAPITAL LIGATURE A IEӔAlt + 1236CYRILLIC SMALL LIGATURE A IEӕAlt + 1237CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER IE WITH BREVEӖAlt + 1238CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER IE WITH BREVEӗAlt + 1239CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER SCHWAӘAlt + 1240CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER SCHWAәAlt + 1241CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER SCHWA WITH DIAERESISӚAlt + 1242CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER SCHWA WITH DIAERESISӛAlt + 1243CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER ZHE WITH DIAERESISӜAlt + 1244CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER ZHE WITH DIAERESISӝAlt + 1245CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER ZE WITH DIAERESISӞAlt + 1246CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER ZE WITH DIAERESISӟAlt + 1247CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER ABKHASIAN DZEӠAlt + 1248CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER ABKHASIAN DZEӡAlt + 1249CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER I WITH MACRONӢAlt + 1250CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER I WITH MACRONӣAlt + 1251CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER I WITH DIAERESISӤAlt + 1252CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER I WITH DIAERESISӥAlt + 1253CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER O WITH DIAERESISӦAlt + 1254CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER O WITH DIAERESISӧAlt + 1255CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER BARRED OӨAlt + 1256CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER BARRED OөAlt + 1257CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER BARRED O WITH DIAERESISӪAlt + 1258CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER BARRED O WITH DIAERESISӫAlt + 1259CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER E WITH DIAERESISӬAlt + 1260CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER E WITH DIAERESISӭAlt + 1261CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER U WITH MACRONӮAlt + 1262CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER U WITH MACRONӯAlt + 1263CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER U WITH DIAERESISӰAlt + 1264CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER U WITH DIAERESISӱAlt + 1265CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER U WITH DOUBLE ACUTEӲAlt + 1266CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER U WITH DOUBLE ACUTEӳAlt + 1267CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER CHE WITH DIAERESISӴAlt + 1268CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER CHE WITH DIAERESISӵAlt + 1269CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER YERU WITH DIAERESISӸAlt + 1272CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER YERU WITH DIAERESISӹAlt + 1273

Note: Using the alt code approach means that you have a lot to learn. And as we all know, learning these alt codes will take a lot of practice as there are many alt codes to remember. However, you can create a cheat sheet for quick reference if you happen to type Russian letters frequently.

Instead of trying to type these characters with your own keyboard, you are presented with a virtual Russian keyboard that includes all of the language’s characters.

You will also be given a simple text editor in which to type the characters. After that, you can copy and paste the typed characters into Microsoft Word or wherever you want.

Listed below are some of the best free virtual Russian keyboards.

These are some of the amazing tools you can use to type in Russian.

These are the easiest ways you can use to type Russian letters in Microsoft Word.

If you often need to type a particular Russian letter or character in Word, using the Alt code method will be a good idea.

However, if you want to type a lot of characters, then using one of the virtual keyboards will save you lots of time.

Thank you so much for reading this blog.

How To Type Hindi Letters On English Keyboard (In Ms Word)

Due to improved keyboard controls on devices, typing letters or characters in other languages like Hindi becomes very easy.

Whether you are using a desktop (be it Windows or Mac), laptop, or even on mobile devices, you can easily type Hindi letters with some cool tricks and techniques you’ll learn about in this article.

There are some specialized keyboards that allow you to type these Hindi Characters easily. Thus, if you don’t have these special keyboards, you’ll need some of the techniques in this article to be able to type these characters on an English keyboard.

Without further ado, let’s get started.

There are several approaches to typing or inserting Hindi Characters into Microsoft Word.

Since these characters are not readily available on the keyboard, using their alt codes is the simplest way to type them on Windows.

In this section, I’ll show you how to type Hindi letters on an English keyboard using alt codes.

Each Hindi character has an alt code with which you can use to type it in Microsoft Word.

You’ll learn the alt code to all the Hindi characters in a moment. For now, let’s look at the steps.

To type Hindi Letters in MS Word, obey the following instruction:

First of all, know the alt code of the Hindi letters you want to type. The alt codes for each one of them are listed just below these instructions.

Open your Microsoft Word document and place the insertion pointer where you want to type the Hindi characters.

Turn on your Num Lock. Press Fn+NmLk to turn on Num Lock on laptops without the numeric keypad.

Hold down the Alt key on your keyboard.

Whilst still holding on to the Alt key, press the Hindi alt code.

For example, to type अ, press and hold the Alt key, then type the alt code 2309 on the numeric keypad.

Now release the Alt key.

You should see the Hindi letter inserted as soon as you release the Alt key.

Below are the alt codes for the various Hindi Characters.

1. Alt + 2309 = अ42. Alt + 2350 = म83. Alt + 2391 = ॗ2. Alt + 2310 = आ43. Alt + 2351 = य84. Alt + 2392 = क़3. Alt + 2311 = इ44. Alt + 2352 = र85. Alt + 2393 = ख़4. Alt + 2312 = ई45. Alt + 2353 = ऱ86. Alt + 2394 = ग़5. Alt + 2313 = उ46. Alt + 2354 = ल87. Alt + 2395 = ज़6. Alt + 2314 = ऊ47. Alt + 2355 = ळ88. Alt + 2396 = ड़7. Alt + 2315 = ऋ48. Alt + 2356 = ऴ89. Alt + 2397 = ढ़8. Alt + 2316 = ऌ49. Alt + 2357 = व90. Alt + 2398 = फ़9. Alt + 2317 = ऍ50. Alt + 2358 = श91. Alt + 2399 = य़10. Alt + 2318 = ऎ51. Alt + 2359 = ष92. Alt + 2400 = ॠ11. Alt + 2319 = ए52. Alt + 2360 = स93. Alt + 2401 = ॡ12. Alt + 2320 = ऐ53. Alt + 2361 = ह94. Alt + 2402 = ॢ13. Alt + 2321 = ऑ54. Alt + 2362 = ऺ95. Alt + 2403 = ॣ14. Alt + 2322 = ऒ55. Alt + 2363 = ऻ96. Alt + 2404 = ।15. Alt + 2323 = ओ56. Alt + 2364 = ़97. Alt + 2405 = ॥16. Alt + 2324 = औ57. Alt + 2365 = ऽ98. Alt + 2406 = ०17. Alt + 2325 = क58. Alt + 2366 = ा99. Alt + 2407 = १18. Alt + 2326 = ख59. Alt + 2367 = ि100. Alt + 2408 = २19. Alt + 2327 = ग60. Alt + 2368 = ी101. Alt + 2409 = ३20. Alt + 2328 = घ61. Alt + 2369 = ु102. Alt + 2410 = ४21. Alt + 2329 = ङ62. Alt + 2370 = ू103. Alt + 2411 = ५22. Alt + 2330 = च63. Alt + 2371 = ृ104. Alt + 2412 = ६23. Alt + 2331 = छ64. Alt + 2372 = ॄ105. Alt + 2413 = ७24. Alt + 2332 = ज65. Alt + 2373 = ॅ106. Alt + 2414 = ८25. Alt + 2333 = झ66. Alt + 2374 = ॆ107. Alt + 2415 = ९26. Alt + 2334 = ञ67. Alt + 2375 = े108. Alt + 2416 = ॰27. Alt + 2335 = ट68. Alt + 2376 = ै109. Alt + 2417 = ॱ28. Alt + 2336 = ठ69. Alt + 2377 = ॉ110. Alt + 2418 = ॲ29. Alt + 2337 = ड70. Alt + 2378 = ॊ111. Alt + 2419 = ॳ30. Alt + 2338 = ढ71. Alt + 2379 = ो112. Alt + 2420 = ॴ31. Alt + 2339 = ण72. Alt + 2380 = ौ113. Alt + 2421 = ॵ32. Alt + 2340 = त73. Alt + 2381 = ्114. Alt + 2422 = ॶ33. Alt + 2341 = थ74. Alt + 2382 = ॎ115. Alt + 2423 = ॷ34. Alt + 2342 = द75. Alt + 2383 = ॏ116. Alt + 2424 = ॸ35. Alt + 2343 = ध76. Alt + 2384 = ॐ117. Alt + 2425 = ॹ36. Alt + 2344 = न77. Alt + 2385 = ॑118. Alt + 2426 = ॺ37. Alt + 2345 = ऩ78. Alt + 2386 = ॒119. Alt + 2427 = ॻ38. Alt + 2346 = प79. Alt + 2387 = ॓120. Alt + 2428 = ॼ39. Alt + 2347 = फ80. Alt + 2388 = ॔121. Alt + 2429 = ॽ40. Alt + 2348 = ब81. Alt + 2389 = ॕ122. Alt + 2430 = ॾ41. Alt + 2349 = भ82. Alt + 2390 = ॖ123. Alt + 2431 = ॿ

Note: Using the alt code approach means that you have a lot to learn. And as we all know, learning these alt codes will take a lot of practice as there are many alt codes to remember. However, you can create a cheat sheet for quick reference if you happen to type Hindi letters frequently.

Instead of trying to type these characters with your own keyboard, you are presented with a virtual Hindi keyboard that has all the characters in the language.

You are also given a simple text editor where you can type the characters. And once you are done, you can copy and paste the typed characters into Microsoft Word or wherever you want.

Below are some of the best virtual Hindi keyboards that you can use for free.

These are some of the amazing tools you can use to type in Hindi.

These are some of the easiest ways you can type Hindi letters in Microsoft Word.

You can use the Alt code method if you have some particular Hindi characters you need to type frequently.

However, if it is a one-time thing, using one of the online virtual keyboards will save you a lot of time.

Thank you so much for reading this blog.

How To Type Special Characters And Symbols On Iphone, Ipad, And Mac

Did you know there are many hidden special characters on your iPhone, iPad, and Mac keyboard? The standard keyboard only provides a few character alternatives at first glance. But you can type special characters such as accented characters (like é in café), extended punctuation (…), special symbols (°), ligatures (ae), etc., and  ©, ™, and ® symbols on your iPhone.

Besides, it allows you to access glyphs, symbols, & characters with the keyboard on iOS. So, how do you get special character symbols? Don’t worry! You don’t have to download any additional apps; just read along to know how I add custom characters to my iPhone or Mac keyboard and type special characters.

How to type special characters and symbols on iPhone or iPad

There are over 115 hidden characters and symbols on the English (US) keyboard in iOS 15 and 16 and iPadOS. You can use other symbols like emoticons on other language keyboards.

List of hidden special characters on your iPhone’s keyboard

Diacritics

This set of characters uses diacritics, i.e., independent characters with accent marks, and consists of 93 special characters. It will help you to write phrases like résumé, exposé, rosé, and other accented words in the English language. Usually, an uppercase letter will have the same diacritic as its lowercase.

Chraracter on iOS keyboardAvailable Diacriticsoô ö ò ó œ ø ō õaà á â ä æ ã å āsß ś šeè é ê ë ē ė ęyÿuû ü ù ú ūIî ï í ī į ìzž ź żcç ć čnñ ńlł

Special symbols

There are 25 special characters hidden behind specific keys in the “123” and “#+=” keyboard options. It includes the degree sign (o), many forms of quote marks, and various dashes like the en dash (-) and em dash (—). You can also use inverted punctuation marks like some Spanish words such as ¡feliz cumpleanos! 

Character on iOS keyboardAvailable symbols0°–– — •/$€ £ ¥ ₩ ₹ ¢&§““” “» «.…?¿!¡%‰=≈ ≠‘` ”

Other hidden special character on your iPhone keyboard

Till now, I have only mentioned the list of special characters you can type on the regular English (US) iPhone keyboard. But there’s more! Apple offers several iOS keyboards in other languages with many hidden symbols. Consider the emoticon buttons found on the Kana or Romaji keyboards. It has amusing text-based faces similar to emojis. Keep reading to know how you get special character symbols.

Access emoticons, glyphs, and other symbols on an iOS keyboard

You may get built-in emoticons, glyphs, and others by adding an extra keyboard. ^_^ To do so:

Interestingly, you can also type the Apple logo from these keyboards. Just write “appuru” (Japanese translation of Apple) from the Japanese Kana keyboard. It will be replaced with the Apple logo.

How to insert special characters on Mac

Emoji Quick access tips

Who wants to open the emoji window every time and spend hours finding the desired one? No one, right? I have remembered a few shortcuts for the commonly used special characters. And all the credit goes to the ultimate Mac keyboard shortcuts guide. (Shhh! It’s the secret behind my pro typing skills :p)

Symbols Keyboard shortcut Degree sign °Shift + Option + 8Pound £Option + 3Euro €Option + Shift + 2Penny ¢Option + 4 Copyright ©Option + GRegistered symbol ®Option + RTrademark ™Option + 2Check mark √Option + VApple logo Option + Shift + K

So, that’s all, folks!

You may also like to read…

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Ava

Ava is an enthusiastic consumer tech writer coming from a technical background. She loves to explore and research new Apple products & accessories and help readers easily decode the tech. Along with studying, her weekend plan includes binge-watching anime.

The Weirdest Things We Learned This Week: Killer Surgeons And Mysterious Floating Feet

What’s the weirdest thing you learned this week? Well, whatever it is, we promise you’ll have an even weirder answer if you listen to PopSci’s hit podcast. The Weirdest Thing I Learned This Week hits iTunes, Anchor, and everywhere else you listen to podcasts every Wednesday morning. It’s your new favorite source for the strangest science-adjacent facts, figures, and Wikipedia spirals the editors of Popular Science can muster. If you like the stories in this post, we guarantee you’ll love the show. And if you like what you hear, join us for our next live show on February 1 in New York City. Tickets are on sale now, and they’re going fast.

Fact: Dozens of feet have washed up in the Pacific Northwest—and no one knows why

By Eleanor Cummins

Forget Bigfoot. These regular, human-sized feet are the scariest thing in the Pacific Northwest. On the far left coast of the United States, in the waters between northern Washington state and southern British Columbia, Canada, 21 severed feet and counting have surfaced on local beaches. Some are left, some are right; some belong to women, some to men. Some have really intact skeletons inside, some contain mush. The shoes are pretty universally ugly—and finding one is a terrifying, emotional experience. But after a decade of regular podiatric terror, we still haven’t pinpointed exactly where these feet are coming from, and the most reasonable answer is the least satisfying. Listen to this week’s show to learn more.

Fact: The ability to touch your toes has little to do with your athleticism

By Claire Maldarelli

As a middle schooler, one of my life goals was mastering the Presidential Fitness Award—an accolade given to those who passed a series of gym-class tests including pull-ups, running a mile, and, among other things, the sit and reach: A flexibility test in which one sits with their legs outstretched in a V position and reaches their fingertips as far past their ankles as they can manage. That’s where things went sour for me. I could never reach quite far enough to be a presidential fitness scholar.

It turns out that I’m not alone. I reached out to Jeffrey Jenkins, who is a physiologist at the University of Virginia School of Medicine. And he shed some light on what actually determines a person’s ability to touch their toes.

As Jenkins explained to me, the three biggest factors that contribute to successfully touching your toes are the flexibility of your hamstrings, the range of motion of your hip joints, and the relative length of your arms and your torso to your legs. To a certain degree, you also need to have a flexible spine. The thing is, not all of these are under your control, nor do they determine how healthy or physically fit you are. Having the right combo of these physical characteristics only does one thing: Help you win meaningless achievements like the Presidential Fitness Award.

But if you’re determined to inch closer to touching your toes, listen to the podcast for some special tips.

Fact: Surgery used to be so dangerous that an operation on one patient could kill multiple people

By Rachel Feltman

Lovers of internet trivia and Wikipedia-fueled lore may be familiar with the tale of Robert Liston: according to some medical historians, this 19th-century surgeon once completed a surgical procedure with a 300 percent mortality rate. One patient walked in and three corpses were rolled out. It’s a shocking tale, to be sure, but I couldn’t help but wonder—was it too gruesomely good to be true?

Here’s the supposed story: Liston, renowned as a remarkably fast surgeon (which was basically the only thing a surgeon had going for them, in the days before anesthesia) was performing an amputation. In his rush to severe the limb as swiftly as possible, he also happened to slice off the fingers of his unfortunate assistant. This, as I explain in the episode, is totally plausible. Then, the story goes, both the patient and the surgical assistant got gangrene and died. That’s two fatalities for the price of one! And again, as I explain in the podcast, this is totally believable and probably happened more than once. The third death is the fishiest: according to legend, one of the many people observing the procedure got the (literal) shock of his life when Liston, covered in blood and leg-meat and severed fingers, accidentally snagged the man’s jacket with his knife. I couldn’t find any primary source for this oft-referenced death by fright-induced heart failure, but that isn’t to say I think it’s impossible. After all, how would you react if you watched a surgeon cut his colleague’s hand off and then thought he was turning on you?

If you like The Weirdest Thing I Learned This Week, please subscribe, rate, and review us on iTunes (yes, even if you don’t listen to us on iTunes—it really helps other weirdos find the show). You can also join in the weirdness in our Facebook group and bedeck yourself in weirdo merchandise from our Threadless shop. And don’t forget to snag tickets for our live show on February 1 in NYC.

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