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Dedication

An entomologist feeding bed bugs on his forearm.

When the common bed bug staged its comeback over a decade ago, scientists hadn’t really studied the insect for about forty years. Once it was clear bed bugs weren’t going away, researchers who wanted to learn how to thwart them first had to figure out how to keep thousands–or hundreds of thousands–alive in the lab. The first trick was to feed them. Bed bugs eat just one thing: blood.

But what kind of blood would work? And how to serve it?

It took a year or two for most labs to successfully raise enough bed bugs to run their experiments, and now they are able to test everything from basic behavior to pesticide efficacy. Here’s how they did it in five not-so-simple steps.

Step 1: Pick a blood

Bed bugs specialize on human blood, although they’ll bite other animals if given the chance. So, the easiest way to feed them is to offer an au naturel meal. Some researchers with small populations simply roll up their sleeves or pant legs and strap a container of bed bugs on, letting them feed through a layer of fine mesh that prevents escape.

Those looking to avoid lengthy IRB approval, or who are housing hundreds of thousands of bugs and just don’t have enough arms and legs to go around, purchase animal blood that is more typically used in medical research. Most labs have tried everything from dog to rabbit to chicken blood, with varying success. To make it more palatable, it is often defibrinated, which involves removing a clotting protein called fibrin.

Rabbit

In the 1950s, researchers sometimes fed bed bugs directly on rabbits and other animals. Today, the bugs are usually fed animal blood through artificial feeders.

Step 2: Contain the blood

Where to put all this tasty defibrinated blood? In an artificial bed bug feeder, of course. Options for these run from expensive ready-made devices to crafty DIY projects. The former were originally designed to nourish mosquitoes and other blood-feeding insects, such as the Hemotek system, which costs several thousand dollars. Entomologists at the Ohio State University have adapted this set-up for bed bugs. The researchers turn six self-heating feeders sideways and then press bed-bug-filled Petri dishes with small screen-covered openings against them. This allows the bed bugs to feed while preventing blood leakage.

Hemotek

A Hemotek feeder loaded with defibrinated rabbit blood at OSU.

North Carolina State University entomologists use custom glass feeders designed with internal jackets to allow warm water to circulate around the blood to heat it without diluting it. The researchers place plastic bed bug containers with nylon screen tops on lab jacks and raise them up to individual feeders. Blood cells settle to the bottom of the container, so this makes them more accessible to the bugs.

Custom Feeder

A custom bed bug feeder

Other feeders are far simpler. Bed bug experts at the University of Sheffield in the U.K. sandwich a few CDs together, seal the sides, and then fill the space inside with blood using a hypodermic needle. In order to explore bed bug behavior, the scientists place the feeder and the bed bugs in a large research arena that sits on a seven-watt aquarium heating mat to keep the blood warm.

CD Feeder

Researchers at Sheffield University stick three compact discs together, seal the edges, and fill with blood.

Step 3: Add fake skin

Bed bugs can’t lap up pooled blood: they have to pierce skin and suck. Artificial feeders, then, require a thin layer of a material that is penetrable to the pinprick of a bed bug bite, but that doesn’t leak. For this purpose, researchers seal their feeders with everything from permeable film to silicon liquid applied to thin mesh to condoms.

Parafilm

Some researchers use parafilm to mimic skin in an artificial bed bug feeder.

Step 4: Get them hungry

Bed bugs find a host by picking up on exhaled carbon dioxide and body heat. In addition to the heat sources used for each artificial feeder, which bring the blood roughly to human body temperature, researchers sometimes blow on a bed bug container pre-feeding, which acts as a dinner bell.

Step 5: Feed them

Feeding bed bugs can be a full time job, and labs employ technicians whose main task is to feed and raise the bugs. Some researchers test new batches of blood on a few bed bugs before feeding their entire population to make sure the blood is safe. In at least two cases, a batch of chicken blood tainted with an insecticide-a preventative mite treatment sprayed on the live birds-killed off hundreds of bed bugs intended for research.

Bed Bugs Feeding

Bed bugs climb up to feed from an artificial feeder.

Brooke Borel is a contributing editor at Popular Science and is writing a book about bed bugs for the University of Chicago Press. Follow her on Twitter @brookeborel.

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How To Change The Language Of The News And Interests Feed On Windows.

If you have recently updated to Windows 10 version 20H2 and have started regularly using the News and Interests feed in the taskbar. This article will show you how to change the language should you wish to browse News and Interests content in a different language to the language you run Windows in.

Quick steps for changing the News and Interests feed Language on Windows 10:

Change to the Experience Settings tab.

Change the Language at the top of the page, then Refresh.

Optional: Change to the My Interests tab and adjust what the feed shows you.

How do you change the language of News and Interests without changing your entire operating system language?

Now just Refresh everything and you’re done.

The only catch is that this will change your entire MSN website experience to your new language, not just the News and Interests widget, though I’m sure this isn’t too much of an issue.

How do you customise the rest of your News and Interests experience on Windows 10?

While you are on this page make sure you take the time to visit the Interests tab as well. This is where you can personalise your entire News and Interests feed. If you don’t, you’ll be stuck with a generic feed that Microsoft curates on global trending topics, not the topics you’re most interested in.

As we mentioned above if you aren’t happy with the News and Interests feed on Windows 10 opening Microsoft Edge all the time, you can force it to use your default Internet browser, however, it will require some third-party tools. If you’re using Chrome at the moment I highly suggest giving the new Edge a go for a while, it’s really good!

Tropico 6 Bugs And Game

Tropico 6 Bugs and Game-Breaking Problems: How to Fix Them A carefully-curated list of common problems and their solutions

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As popular as Tropico 6 is, it is still troubled by bugs and some frustrating errors.

If you are dealing with graphical tearing issues, you can disable vertical sync. 

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INSTALL BY CLICKING THE DOWNLOAD FILE

To fix Windows PC system issues, you will need a dedicated tool

Fortect is a tool that does not simply cleans up your PC, but has a repository with several millions of Windows System files stored in their initial version. When your PC encounters a problem, Fortect will fix it for you, by replacing bad files with fresh versions. To fix your current PC issue, here are the steps you need to take:

Download Fortect and install it on your PC.

Start the tool’s scanning process to look for corrupt files that are the source of your problem

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Unlike previous titles, Tropico 6 is one of the best titles of the Tropico series, but it can also be troubled by bugs in its best form.

In this detailed guide, we have gathered the common errors users encounter with this game and explain how to fix them effectively.

How do I fix Tropico 6 bugs and errors?

Before getting into more complicated solutions, make sure you perform the following preliminary steps:

If you have an installation issue, exit Steam and restart your machine. Restart the installation, and verify your file integrity in the Steam client.

For graphical tearing problems, disable the vertical sync since it can reduce graphical tearing. If, after this, you are facing tearing or related bugs while playing Tropico 6, we suggest you toggle vertical sync to back on in your game settings.

1. Audio issues

Head on over to Playback and disable all the sound devices except the internal speaker or the speaker which you wish to use. This should get rid of most audio-related Tropico 6 bugs for good.

2. Black screen issues

In the event that the issue is not resolved, uninstall and reinstall your game.

3. Start-up game crashes 5. Tropico 6 stutter

For this, you’re going to disable the latest DirectX version and restart your game. Keep in mind that stuttering can sometimes be related to driver issues.

The latest driver is not working well with the game, and in this case, we’d recommend you fall back to an older version of the drivers you’re using.

Tips for a smoother Tropico 6 gameplay

For a smoother experience when launching and running Tropico 6 and prevention of bugs, we recommend closing all programs running in the background.

If you experience that your character is warping around the map or getting stuck at the starting point, you might be experiencing connection issues. Check your internet connection and troubleshoot it.

When first playing Tropico 6 use the recommended settings to avoid any performance instability.

When running Tropico 6, keep the requirements in mind for a better experience.

MINIMUM:

Requires a 64-bit processor and operating system

OS: Windows 7 64-bit

Processor: AMD or Intel, 3 GHz (AMD A10 7850K, Intel i3-2000)

Memory: 8 GB RAM

Graphics: AMD/NVIDIA dedicated GPU, 2GB dedicated VRAM (Radeon HD 7870, Geforce GTX 750)

DirectX: Version 11

Storage: 16 GB available space

RECOMMENDED:

Requires a 64-bit processor and operating system

OS: Windows 10 64-bit

Processor: AMD or Intel, 3.3 GHz (AMD FX 8300, Intel i5 3000)

Memory: 16 GB RAM

Graphics: AMD/NVIDIA dedicated GPU, 4GB dedicated VRAM (Radeon R9 380, Geforce GTX 960)

Storage: 16 GB available space

With this, we can conclude this guide on how to fix popular Tropico 6 bugs and errors. In the same vein, if you want to know how to fix the common Anno bugs, check our detailed guide to do it quickly.

How do you like the Tropico 6 game so far? Do you rule with an iron fist, or do you run your nation with peace?

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What Do You Do With 34 Metric Tons Of Weapons

When the United States broke off cease-fire talks with Russia over the war in Syria (after the Russian air force continued to bomb civilians in Aleppo), Russian President Vladimir Putin retaliated by suspending a nearly two-decades old arms agreement to get rid of his country’s extra weapons-grade plutonium.

Signed in 2000, the Plutonium Management and Disposition Agreement stipulated that each country dispose of weapons-grade plutonium they deemed no longer required for defense purposes. Each country agreed to get rid of 34 metric tons of its excess stockpile.

Much of that excess is from the dismantlement of tens of thousands of Cold War nuclear weapons. Russia has stored some of it in the closed city of Seversk, in western Siberia–home to two of its former plutonium-producing nuclear reactors and, at one time, among the largest nuclear complexes on the planet. When the treaty was signed in 2000, the Russians were, according to The Economist, storing highly-enriched uranium and plutonium from dismantled nukes in 23,000 canisters at the site.

Neither Russia nor the U.S. has been quick to dispose of their excess plutonium. (It’s extremely difficult to do). But with Russia now in essence putting its stockpile back on the table in its geopolitical game of Risk, many questions arise. Namely, what is this stuff? And how the heck do we get rid of it?

What Is Weapons-Grade Plutonium?

As its name implies, weapons-grade plutonium is very good at exploding. The reason for this is the presence of plutonium-239–a plutonium isotope characterized by its long lifespan (half-life: more than 24,000 years) and an ability, when smashed, to release a lot of energy; One kilogram of plutonium-239 releases more energy than the 64 kilograms of uranium that were in the Little Boy bomb the U.S. dropped on Hiroshima in World War II.

This particular plutonium is a byproduct of uranium-238 (a naturally-occurring form of uranium and the the most abundant on earth, found in uranium mines across the globe), after it has been used in nuclear energy reactors. Plutonium-239 packs its most powerful punch in high concentrations. So-called weapons-grade plutonium–the type Russia and the U.S. have on hand–is at least 93 per cent plutonium-239, with the remaining seven per cent being other plutonium isotopes.

Breaking apart at devastatingly high speeds is pretty much the only thing plutonium-239 is good at. There aren’t many other practical uses for it. It could be used to (slowly) heat water, sold by the government in one gram amounts as reference samples, or serve as a very dense, mostly safe paperweight–in small chunks, plutonium-239 doesn’t let off much spontaneous radiation. (Plutonium-238, a close relative, can power things; NASA uses it to power its deep-space probes.) But plutonium-239 releases so much more energy that it can only be used in certain kinds of nuclear reactors. Since its discovery during the Manhattan Project in the 1940s, it has first and foremost been a weapon.

The U.S. holds 81.3 metric tons of plutonium-239, while Russia holds 128. Disposing of a combined 68 metric tons would significantly reduce the stockpiles between the two nations. Graphic by Sara Chodosh

How Do We Get Rid of This Stuff?

One reason the disposal agreement between Russia and the U.S. took a decade to settle was that they couldn’t agree on how to dispose of this stuff. The only realistic option, and the one settled on, was to convert it into plutonium oxide, a chemical compound of plutonium and oxygen, which could still–by the way–be used as a small nuclear weapon, but which the countries intended to combine with uranium oxide to create mixed oxide (MOX) fuel. That’s stuff that can be used in commercial power reactors. As a bonus, MOX fuel cannot be used for weapons, meaning once the plutonium-239 is caught up in it, it can’t be returned to its original, explosive state.

It’s an expensive process. The U.S. began construction in 2007 on a facility at the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Savannah River Site in South Carolina to convert the surplus plutonium-239 to MOX fuel. The MOX Fuel Fabrication Facility is still unfinished and beleaguered by opposition; Neither the government nor U.S. commercial reactors are properly equipped to handle MOX fuel. It’s expected to cost as much as $10 billion to finish construction, and the cost of converting 34 metric tons of plutonium is expected to cost an additional $24 billion.

Plutonium-239 doesn’t have to be used in weapons, but after converting it to fuel, there aren’t many other practical options. Graphic by Sara Chodosh

ARIES is an eight-step process. It handles everything from dismantling a weapon, removing its pit, converting the pit’s plutonium into a plutonium oxide before further refining it, and ultimately packaging it for long-term storage in a vault at Los Alamos’ Technical Area 55 Plutonium Facility. The work is every bit as challenging as it sounds: Technicians dismantling a weapon must work through gloveboxes. These large, airtight containers separate the technicians from the weapon, and all of their work is done through a series of large gloves attached at various points. It involves firing the plutonium pits, carved into chunks, in furnaces until they become the sand-like plutonium oxide.

ARIES glovebox

Extracting plutonium pits–spheres that resemble apricot or peach pits–from dismantled nuclear weapons is delicate work, made even more complicated by the glovebox surrounding the weapon and keeping the technicians safe.

At its current rate of 300 kilograms per year, it would take ARIES well over 100 years to convert all 34 metric tons of plutonium the U.S. has agreed to dispose.

It will take decades for the U.S. to convert its excess plutonium-239 into fuel, but even longer to wait for it to decay naturally—about 24,000 years. Graphic by Sara Chodosh

So What’s the Hold Up?

The DOE is stepping away from its MOX plans. Its 2024 budget requests $270 million to terminate the MOX Fuel Fabrication Facility’s construction, and asks an additional $15 million to pursue a dilute-and-dispose option. Instead of converting the excess plutonium into MOX fuel, the new plan is to blend the plutonium oxide with a series of cementing, gelling, thickening and foaming agents into a mixture called “stardust.” National Nuclear Security Administration [NNSA] experts informed Popular Science that for the dilute-and-dispose method, plutonium oxide is still necessary. Its sand-like quality makes it possible to mix it into the stardust.

A Los Alamos report indicates that by the end of the process, stardust is less then 10 per cent plutonium. As an added precaution, the stardust would be sealed in double-layered stainless steel containers and stored in a “geologic repository”–perhaps at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico, where other nuclear waste is stored. In other words, it would be buried.

NNSA experts also said that in order to pursue the dilute-and-dispose method, Los Alamos is in the process of expanding its ability to convert weapons-grade plutonium to plutonium oxide. ARIES is committed to two metric tons of plutonium oxide–the rest will be done on-site once Los Alamos can handle the task.

In a statement to Popular Science, the DOE said the U.S. remains committed to verifiably disposing of its excess plutonium, despite Russia’s walk-back on the pledge. It also confirmed that the dilute-and-dispose method is now being pursued for plutonium stores not covered by the agreement, rather than the MOX fuel method, because dilute-and-dispose will be cheaper and quicker to implement.

The agreement states that the 34 metric tons of weapons-grade plutonium being disposed must either be used as fuel–which is why Russia had chosen to convert its excess into MOX fuel–or converted into immobilized forms. NNSA experts said that the dilute-and-dispose method can be considered an immobilized form under the terms of the agreement once it has been mixed into stardust and stored.

The U.S. Department of State, which oversees the country’s involvement in the agreement, has not responded to questions about how long it will take for the U.S. to complete its disposal of its 34 metric tons of weapons-grade plutonium and whether the dilute-and-dispose method will be used for it.

There’s no word on what Russia plans to do.

Researchers Train Artificial Intelligence To Write Code

Code is a system of rules to alter information into another form or representation, sometimes shortened or surreptitious, for communication through a channel or a storage medium. Understanding to code consists of classifying exactly how to structure a program, as well as how to fill out every last insight precisely. It can be so exasperating. So, a brand-new program-writing artificial intelligence, named SketchAdapt, provides an escape. Trained on tens of thousands of program instance, the AI system learns how to compose a brief, top-level programs, while enabling the second set of formulas to find the right sub-programs to fill in the details. Comparable to analogous methods for automated program-writing, SketchAdapt understands when to switch over analytical pattern-matching to a less efficient, but more dynamic, symbolic thinking mode to fill out the gaps. Professor at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL), Armando Solar-Lezama says, “Neural nets are pretty good at getting the structure right, but not the details. By dividing up the labor — letting the neural nets handle the high-level structure, and using a search strategy to fill in the blanks — we can write efficient programs that give the right answer.”  

SketchAdapt Overview

As a collaboration between Solar-Lezama and Josh Tenenbaum, a professor at CSAIL and MIT’s Center for Brains, Minds, and Machines, the SketchAdapt work presented at the International Conference on Machine Learning on June 10-15. For AI researchers, program synthesis, training computer systems to code, has long been an objective. A computer system that can program itself is much likely to learn a language faster, converse smoothly, and even model human cognition. Entire these things lured Solar-Lezama to the field as a college student, where he colonized SketchAdapt. Solar-Lezama’s early job, Sketch, is relying on the concept that a program’s low-level details could be divulged automatically if a high-level structure is provided. Unlike other applications, the new program-writing AI inspired offshoots to automatically show programming homework and alter hand-drawn representations into code. Afterward, as neural networks expanded in popularity, Tenenbaum’s computational cognitive science lab trainees recommended a collaboration, out of which SketchAdapt formed. Despite count on professionals to outline program structure, SketchAdapt recognizes it by leveraging deep learning. The researchers also included a spin, when the neural networks are uncertain over what code is to position where, so the new program-writing AI is configured to leave the place blank for search algorithms to fill. “The system decides for itself what it knows and doesn’t know,” according to the study’s lead author, Maxwell Nye, a graduate student in MIT’s Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences.  “When it gets stuck and has no familiar patterns to draw on, it leaves placeholders in the code. It then uses a guess-and-check strategy to fill the holes,” he added.  

Performance of SkectAdapt

The researchers also compared SketchAdapt’s efficiency to programs imitated by Microsoft’s proprietary RobustFill and DeepCoder software, inheritors to Excel’s FlashFill feature. After comparing to these, researchers found that SketchAdapt outpaced their reimplemented versions of RobustFill and DeepCoder at their respective focused tasks. It also outperformed the RobustFill-like programs at string makeovers. Moreover, SketchAdapt also outshined the DeepCoder-like program at writing programs to alter a list of numbers. Competent only on instances of three-line list-processing programs, the program-writing AI was better able to convert its knowledge to a new environment and write correct four-line programs. SketchAdapt, in yet further task, outstripped both programs at transforming math problems to code from English and determining the answer.

Code is a system of rules to alter information into another form or representation, sometimes shortened or surreptitious, for communication through a channel or a storage medium. Understanding to code consists of classifying exactly how to structure a program, as well as how to fill out every last insight precisely. It can be so exasperating. So, a brand-new program-writing artificial intelligence, named SketchAdapt, provides an escape. Trained on tens of thousands of program instance, the AI system learns how to compose a brief, top-level programs, while enabling the second set of formulas to find the right sub-programs to fill in the details. Comparable to analogous methods for automated program-writing, SketchAdapt understands when to switch over analytical pattern-matching to a less efficient, but more dynamic, symbolic thinking mode to fill out the gaps. Professor at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL), Armando Solar-Lezama says, “Neural nets are pretty good at getting the structure right, but not the details. By dividing up the labor — letting the neural nets handle the high-level structure, and using a search strategy to fill in the blanks — we can write efficient programs that give the right answer.”As a collaboration between Solar-Lezama and Josh Tenenbaum, a professor at CSAIL and MIT’s Center for Brains, Minds, and Machines, the SketchAdapt work presented at the International Conference on Machine Learning on June 10-15. For AI researchers, program synthesis, training computer systems to code, has long been an objective. A computer system that can program itself is much likely to learn a language faster, converse smoothly, and even model human cognition. Entire these things lured Solar-Lezama to the field as a college student, where he colonized SketchAdapt. Solar-Lezama’s early job, Sketch, is relying on the concept that a program’s low-level details could be divulged automatically if a high-level structure is provided. Unlike other applications, the new program-writing AI inspired offshoots to automatically show programming homework and alter hand-drawn representations into code. Afterward, as neural networks expanded in popularity, Tenenbaum’s computational cognitive science lab trainees recommended a collaboration, out of which SketchAdapt formed. Despite count on professionals to outline program structure, SketchAdapt recognizes it by leveraging deep learning. The researchers also included a spin, when the neural networks are uncertain over what code is to position where, so the new program-writing AI is configured to leave the place blank for search algorithms to fill. “The system decides for itself what it knows and doesn’t know,” according to the study’s lead author, Maxwell Nye, a graduate student in MIT’s Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences. “When it gets stuck and has no familiar patterns to draw on, it leaves placeholders in the code. It then uses a guess-and-check strategy to fill the holes,” he chúng tôi researchers also compared SketchAdapt’s efficiency to programs imitated by Microsoft’s proprietary RobustFill and DeepCoder software, inheritors to Excel’s FlashFill feature. After comparing to these, researchers found that SketchAdapt outpaced their reimplemented versions of RobustFill and DeepCoder at their respective focused tasks. It also outperformed the RobustFill-like programs at string makeovers. Moreover, SketchAdapt also outshined the DeepCoder-like program at writing programs to alter a list of numbers. Competent only on instances of three-line list-processing programs, the program-writing AI was better able to convert its knowledge to a new environment and write correct four-line programs. SketchAdapt, in yet further task, outstripped both programs at transforming math problems to code from English and determining the answer. As per the researchers, SketchAdapt is limited to composing very brief programs. Anything more requires too much calculation. However, it’s aimed more to complement programmers despite replacing them.

Another Java Flaw Exploited, Security Researchers Warn

A new exploit for a previously unknown and unpatched Java vulnerability is being actively used by attackers to infect computers with malware, according to researchers from security firm FireEye.

“We observed successful exploitation against browsers that have Java v1.6 Update 41 and Java v1.7 Update 15 installed,” FireEye researchers Darien Kindlund and Yichong Lin said Thursday in a blog post.

In the attacks analyzed by FireEye, the exploit is being used to download and install a remote access tool (RAT) called McRAT. This type of malware is frequently used in targeted attacks, but FireEye did not disclose any information about who is being targeted.

A screen shot of the exploit’s traffic published by the company reveals that the malware is being downloaded from a Japanese website as a .jpg file, although the extension is probably fake and used as a diversion.

Security researchers from antivirus vendor Kaspersky Lab confirmed Friday that the exploit works against Java 7 Update 15, which is the most recent version of Java, but said that it fails on older versions, like Java 7 Update 10. The attack appears to be a targeted one, said Costin Raiu, director of Kaspersky’s global research and analysis team, but he had no additional information to share.

Attacks encourage Java bug-hunters

News of this zero-day—previously unknown—Java exploit comes days after researchers from Polish vulnerability research firm Security Explorations found and reported two new Java vulnerabilities to Oracle.

The exploit reported by FireEye seems to target a memory corruption vulnerability that’s different from what Security Explorations found, Adam Gowdiak, the founder of Security Explorations, said Friday via email.

“We try to avoid [researching] memory corruption vulnerabilities in Java as they are not that powerful as pure Java level bugs,” Gowdiak said. Only one of the 55 Java security issues reported by Security Explorations in the past year was a memory corruption vulnerability, he said.

Gowdiak believes that the recent security breaches at Twitter, Facebook, Apple, and Microsoft that resulted from an attack using a different Java zero-day exploit, might have triggered additional interest in Java bugs from attackers.

“We have notified Oracle and will continue to work with Oracle on this in-the-wild discovery,” the FireEye researchers said. “Since this exploit affects the latest Java 6u41 and Java 7u15 versions, we urge users to disable Java in your browser until a patch has been released; alternatively, set your Java security settings to ‘High’ and do not execute any unknown Java applets outside of your organization.”

String of zero-day exploits

This is the third time this year attackers have used zero-day Java exploits. The increased frequency of attacks has forced Oracle to reduce the time between scheduled Java patches from four months to two months and set the security controls for Java applets in browsers to “High” by default.

Following the Java-based attacks on Twitter, Facebook, Apple and Microsoft engineers that were launched from a compromised community forum for iOS developers, Oracle broke out of its patching cycle to release an emergency security update on February 1.

The company followed that up with another patch on February 19. The next security updates for Java are scheduled for April 16, but it’s possible that Oracle will be forced to release an emergency patch again in order to fix this actively exploited vulnerability.

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