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I received an email from Bill this week asking how he can check if a range of cells contains text or numbers, as opposed to being empty.

We can use the ISTEXT function to test for text, and ISNUMBER function to test for numbers, but these only work on one cell at a time.

Here’s the syntax:

=ISTEXT(value)

=ISNUMBER(value)

Where ‘value’ is the reference of the cell you want to test.

We can see them in action in the image below:

But Bill wants to test the whole range, A4:A10, to see if any cells contain text or numbers.

To check a range we can combine the ISTEXT and ISNUMBER functions with SUMPRODUCT like this:

So, how does this Beauty work?

Although this isn’t strictly an array formula, in that you don’t have to enter it with CTRL+SHIFT+ENTER, the SUMPRODUCT function behaves just like an array formula.

Let’s look at how it evaluates:

Step 1 – ISTEXT returns an array of TRUE/FALSE for each cell in the range A4:A10 like so:

Step 2 – ISNUMBER also returns an array of TRUE/FALSE for each cell in the range A4:A10 like so:

Step 3 – Now, since TRUE/FALSE have equivalent number values of 1 for TRUE, and 0 for FALSE when we apply the + to the two arrays inside the SUMPRODUCT function it converts them to their numeric equivalent like so:

Step 4 – SUMPRODUCT then adds the 1’s and 0’s together:

Step 5 – it tests whether the result of the SUMPRODUCT formula is greater than 0. If it is it returns TRUE, if not FALSE.

Array Formula Option

Of course we could achieve the same result from this array formula:

Although this is slightly shorter to write, remember because it’s an array formula we need to enter it with CTRL+SHIFT+ENTER.

Return a Different Message

If you want to return a ‘Yes’ or ‘No’, as opposed to the TRUE/FALSE outcomes, we can do this with an IF function like so:

Test for Numbers Only

Note the difference in this formula is the *1 after the ISNUMBER test.  This is to coerce the TRUE/FALSE values into their numeric equivalents of 1 and zero.

We didn’t have to do this in the original formula because the + in the SUMPRODUCT function did that for us:

Another way to coerce TRUE/FALSE values is with the double unary like so:

Test for Text Only

Or with the double unary:

Test if a Range is Empty

We can use the ISBLANK function to test if a cell is empty, but like ISTEXT and ISNUMBER, it only works on one cell at a time. The solution is to use SUMPRODUCT to test a range of cells and then compare the result to the number of cells in the range like so:

=SUMPRODUCT(--ISBLANK(A4:A10))=ROWS(A4:A10)

The ISBLANK function returns a TRUE for every blank cell, which we then coerce into the numeric equivalent using the double unary – -.

The ROWS function returns the number of cells (or rows) in a range.

Using the original data as our example:

The ISBLANK formula evaluates like this:

=SUMPRODUCT({1,0,0,1,0,0,0})=7   =2=7   =FALSE

If the range A4:A10 were empty it would evaluate like this:

=SUMPRODUCT({1,1,1,1,1,1,1})=7   =7=7   =TRUE

Now, if you’ve read this far and are keeping up with me then you might be thinking, ‘can I use ISBLANK to test if any cells contain text or numbers instead of the original ISTEXT/ISNUMBER formula?’

The answer is yes, like this:

In English: if the number of BLANK cells in the range A4:A10 is not equal to the number of rows in the range A4:A10 you will get TRUE, meaning there is at least one cell in the range that isn’t blank.

The downside of this option is the double negatives can do your head in, whereas interpreting the ISTEXT and ISNUMBER formula is a bit less draining on your brain power 🙂

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Thanks

Thank you to Bill for inspiring this tutorial.

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How To Check If Cell Begins Or Ends With A Specific Character In Excel?

When we have a list of entries in excel file and need to identify if there are some entities starting with a specific letter of special character, then looking at each value and counting will be a tedious task to do. This article will help you to find those entities using a formula without looking at each value of the list.

Searching Cells containing Specific Character using Formula Searching the cells starting with a specific character

Let’s take an example of the following data −

Now, if you want to check the cells begin with the character “$” then follow the below steps −

Step 1 − Create a column where you want to the output to be displayed against each cell.

Step 2 − Enter the following formula by selecting the required cell whose value to be scanned and press enter.

=IF(LEFT(TRIM(B2),1)=”$”,”True”, “False”)

Step 3 − Now drag the cell to copy the formula in other cells also to view the output against all cells.

Formula Syntax Description

Argument Description

IF(logical_test, {value_if_true},{value_if_false}

Logical_test specifies the condition basis which the data needs to be rendered.

Value_if_true specifies the value that shall be returned if the condition satisfies.

Value_if_false specifies the value that shall be returned if the condition does not satisfy.

LEFT(text, [num_chars])

Text specifies the cell address whose value to be returned or scanned from left.

num_chars specifies the number of characters from left that need to be returned/scanned.

TRIM(

Removes all extra spaces from the string of selected cell except for single spaces between words.

Searching the cells ending with a specific character

Now, if you want to check the cells ends with the character “n” then follow the below steps −

Step 1 − Create a column where you want to the output to be displayed against each cell.

Step 2 − Enter the following formula by selecting the required cell whose value to be scanned and press enter.

=IF(RIGHT(TRIM(B2),1)=”n”,”True”, “False”)

Step 3 − Now drag the cell to copy the formula in other cells also to view the output against all cells.

Formula Syntax Description

Argument Description

RIGHT(text, [num_chars])

Text specifies the cell address whose value to be returned or scanned from right

num_chars specifies the number of characters from left that need to be returned/scanned.

Searching the cells starting and ending with a specific character

Now, if you want to check the cells starting and ending with the character “s” and “n” respectively,then follow the below steps −

Step 1 − Create a column where you want to the output to be displayed against each cell.

Step 2 − Enter the following formula by selecting the required cell whose value to be scanned and press enter.

=IF(AND(LEFT(TRIM(B3),1)=”s”,RIGHT(TRIM(B3),1)=”n”),TRUE,FALSE)

Step 3 − Now drag the cell to copy the formula in other cells also to view the output against all cells.

Formula Syntax Description

Argument Description

AND

This operator is used in IF statement when two conditions simultaneously need to be verified. Similarly OR (either) and NOT (not satisfied) conditions can be used.

Conclusion

Hence, using the above-mentioned formulas any number of data can be verified for specific values. These formulas will reduce the processing time of a dataset and enhance the user experience and data visualization. Keep learning, keep exploring Excel.

How To Determine If Iphone Is Gsm Or Cdma

Most of us geekier folks instantly know if our iPhones are CDMA or GSM models, but not everyone pays as much attention to the largely insignificant technical details of their phones. Not to worry, it’s extremely easy to find out if an iPhone is GSM or CDMA, all you need to do is look at the model number of the device.

To find out if the phone is CDMA or GSM, flip the iPhone over and look at the back. Locate the string number alongside “Model” as highlighted in this image, and then and compare it against the list below:

Once you have made note of the model shown on the back of the phone, you can determine if it’s GSM or CDMA by matching it:

iPhone GSM Model Numbers

iPhone 5: A1429 (* World GSM & CDMA)

iPhone 5: A1428

iPhone 4S: A1387 (* dual band CDMA & GSM world phone)

iPhone 4S: A1531 (GSM China)

iPhone 4: A1332

iPhone 3GS: A1325 (GSM China)

iPhone 3GS: A1303

iPhone 3G: A1324 (GSM China)

iPhone 3G: A1241

iPhone 1: A1203

iPhone CDMA Model Numbers

iPhone 5: A1429 (* World GSM & CDMA)

iPhone 4S: A1387 (* dual band CDMA & GSM world phone)

iPhone 4: A1349

Once you have made note of the model shown on the back of the phone, you can determine if it’s GSM or CDMA by matching it:

Knowing the model numbers is guaranteed and is pretty quick, and it’s also the best way to determine what model an iPhone is that won’t turn on. For customers in the USA, another easy way to tell if it’s GSM or CDMA is just to find out what cell carrier the iPhone uses. AT&T is always GSM, T-Mobile is always GSM, while Verizon and Sprint are always CDMA. You can also generally assume that if it uses a SIM card to get online, it’s a GSM iPhone, though some iPhone models like the iPhone 4S have both CDMA and GSM capabilities. The cell carrier isn’t always a reliable method though, because sometimes an iPhone won’t turn on, is out of battery or just plain dead, or it could even be a dualband world phone like the 4S.

What if the iPhone Model Number is Rubbed Off?

If the model number isn’t entirely clear, or it has worn off, you can still identify the device through iTunes to find similar information about the phone.

If that isn’t an option, you can also check on the device itself by opening Settings, tap General then “About”, and look under “Network” or “Carrier” instead, you’ll then need to just figure out of the carrier is GSM (AT&T, T-Mobile) or CDMA (Sprint, Verizon).

Why Does it Matter?

For the vast majority of iPhone users, it doesn’t, they’ll never need to know or care about their device being GSM or CDMA. This is really mostly helpful to those who use IPSW (IPSW is iOS firmware, basically the iPhone system software) to either update a device manually, for jailbreaking purposes, or for restoring a device in the event of a significant software failure. In that case, knowing which model a device is important when downloading IPSW files for iPhones.

Thanks for the tip jlfafi!

Related

Return A Range From A Udf

I’ve previously written a UDF to count colored cells and then perform various maths functions on the values in those cells, like SUM, AVERAGE or COUNT.

In this post I’m going to rewrite that code so that we can return a range from a UDF. This range contains all the cells that match the reference color, and you can then use this range in other functions and calculations.

The UDF

The UDF is called FindColors and is really a pretty straightforward few lines of VBA:

' ' Written by Philip Treacy ' Function FindColors(InputRange As Range, ReferenceCell As Range) As Range Dim ReferenceColor As Long Dim Cell As Range, Result As Range ReferenceColor = ReferenceCell.Interior.Color For Each Cell In InputRange If Cell.Interior.Color = ReferenceColor Then If Result Is Nothing Then Set Result = Cell Else Set Result = Union(Result, Cell) End If End If Next Cell Set FindColors = Result End Function

All we need to do is check each cell in the InputRange sent to the function, to see if that cell has the same background color as our ReferenceCell.

A regular old For … Next loop does this job for us.

UNION

If we find cells that match the color of our ReferenceCell, we use the UNION operator to join these separate cells together into a single range.

Set Result = Union(Result, Cell)

Returning the Resulting Range

The last thing to do is return the result of the function, which is the range of colored cells matching our ReferenceCell.

But, because we are returning a range object we must Set the function result like so:

Set FindColors = Result

Using the UDF Result

If you want to find the SUM of all cells colored the same as B9, and where ColoredCells is a named range, you’d enter this in a cell:

=SUM(FindColors(ColoredCells,B9))

Download a Sample Workbook

There are several examples in the workbook you can download :

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A Word on Recalculation

If you change the background color of the cell using the Ribbon (or a couple of other ways), the function output is not recalculated. That’s just the way Excel works and I wrote about this in a previous post – check the section headed Recalculation.

Bonus Function – GetColor

This was in the previous workbook too, but I didn’t mention it.

Use this function to get the hex value of a cell’s background color. Or to check that certain cells all have the same color.

To use it just call the function from a cell:

=GetColor(B9)

Check Out Other Posts on User Defined Functions

Creating a UDF

Creating Multi-Function UDF’s

Creating a Reference to PERSONAL.XLSB

Creating an Excel Add-In For UDF’s

Count, Sum and Average Colored Cells

Text To Columns In Excel (Examples)

Introduction

Text To Column option in Excel is available in the Data menu tab under the Data Tools section, which is used for separating text available in a cell or column to the columns by splitting them with different criteria.

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Text to columns in Excel is used to split the contents of a cell into two or more columns using the fixed-width or delimiter method.

For instance, if you have a list of fruits and their prices written together in a single cell like “Banana ($0.85), Orange ($1.50), Apple ($1.75)“, then you can use the “Text to Columns” tool to split this data into separate columns for each fruit and its price.

Where is Text to Columns in Excel?

The “Text to Columns” option is present in the “Data tools” of the “Data” tab”.

You can use delimiter or fixed-width options depending on the data and how you want to split the text.

Options

Description

Example

Pros

Delimited Splits text based on a specific character, such as commas, tabs, spaces, semicolons, hyphens, etc. If you have a cell with “Olivia Alex,456 Main Street, Austin, USA”, you can split it into name, address, and location. This method is quick and easy to use.

Fixed Width Splits text based on a specific character count, dividing the values into specific columns. If you have a 9-lettered name and want to split it at the 6th character. This method is useful when dividing text with a specific character count.

How to Use Text to Columns in Excel?

You can download this Text to Columns in Excel Template here – Text to Columns in Excel Template

Example #1 Delimited Option

Purpose: Split the given names into First Name and Last Name.

Consider the data below, which contains a few individuals’ phone numbers. Here, First Names and Last Names are present in a single column. We want to split each name into First and Last Names using the delimited option.

Solution:

Note: If you do not insert another column after column A, then the other portion of data will overwrite in the adjacent column. For example, the first name will appear in Column A, and the last name will appear in Column B by replacing the phone number.

Note: In our case, a name is separated by space. So, we have to select the Delimited option.

Step 4: Select “Space” from the delimiters.

Note: This example has spaces as delimiters.

Note: A “Data preview” window at the bottom of the “Convert Text to Columns Wizard” dialogue box will display the result.  We can see how the delimiters will affect the data or, in other words, how the result will look.

Note: If you don’t select a destination cell, it will overwrite your existing data set in the first column with the first name and the last name in the adjacent column. Choose a different destination cell to keep the original data intact.

The result is displayed below. Here, the first name appears in column A, and the last name appears in column B.

Step 6: Make the column name more specific, as shown below.

Let’s take another scenario where you want to keep the original data intact and want to display First Name in Column B and Last Name in Column C.

Step 1: Insert two columns after column A.

Example #2 Fixed-width Method

Purpose: Split date and time.

The below data set contains details of the students who filled out a Google form. Column A includes data in date and time format, like 4/1/2023 at 9:58:34 AM. Here, we want to separate the date and time into columns, i.e. 4/1/2023 in one column and  9:58:34 AM in another.

Solution:

Step 1: Insert a column between Column A & Column B.

Step 4: Create a break line in the desired position. Here, we have created a line between date and time.

Note: The instruction for column break is already given in the dialog box, like how to create, delete and move a broken line. The column break allows us to set the field width (character count) as how we want to separate the data. We can divide it into two columns, i.e. Date format in one column and time format (AM/PM) in another column format, or we can have a date in one column, time in another, and AM-PM in another one. We can also see how the data will look in the preview section.

The result is displayed below. Here, the time is separated from the date.

Example #3 Delimited Option

Consider the below example. Column B contains audit details along with the employee’s name and ID. Here, all data is in one single column. We want to display the employees’ IDs, first names, and last names in three columns. A hyphen and space separate the data in Column B, so we will use the delimited option to split it.

Step 1: Insert three columns between column B and Column C

Step 3: Select “Delimited” from the “Original data type”, as shown below.

Step 6: Select “General” from the “Column data format” and the “Destination” cell.

The result is displayed below. Here, the original data of column B is split into three columns, and we have named it ID, first name, and second name, respectively.

Things to Remember

The keyboard shortcut to access Text to Columns in Excel is Alt + A + E.

Use the delimited method when the text strings contain commas, spaces, semicolons, and other special characters.

Identify the correct delimiter while using the delimited feature. For instance, in “Karen, Wilson”, the delimiter is a comma (,).

Use the fixed-width method to separate text using character count.

A Data Preview window is at the bottom of the Text to Columns wizard dialog box. After choosing the format options, the data preview will display how your data will look.

Always insert columns equal to the number of data you want to separate.

In fixed width, create an arrow in the desired position to split the data.

The final result of the Text to Columns in Excel is static. You must repeat the process to get updated results if there are any changes in the original data.

Select the proper destination cell where you want the result. Otherwise, it can lead to overwriting of data in the existing column.

If you want the original data, make a copy or select another destination cell.

Assignment for You: 2-Minute Challenge!

You have got 2 minutes to put your skills to the test and see if you can solve this problem on your own. Don’t worry. You’ve got this! You are already familiar with all the steps, so let’s see how quickly you can complete this assignment.

To complete the assignment, please download this template.

You can download this Assignment Template here – Assignment Template

In the template, we have provided a list of usernames, followers, and engagement rates for an influencer campaign. Your task is to separate this information into different columns using the “Text to Columns” tool in 2 minutes.

Recommended Articles

This article has been a guide to Text to Columns in Excel. Here we discuss its uses and how to convert Text to Columns in Excel with some examples and downloadable Excel templates. You may also look at these useful functions in Excel –

How To Create A Vba Macro Or Script In Excel

Microsoft Excel enables users to automate features and commands using macros and Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) scripting. VBA is the programming language Excel uses to create macros. It will also execute automated commands based on specific conditions.

Macros are a series of pre-recorded commands. They run automatically when a specific command is given. If you have tasks in Microsoft Excel that you repeatedly do, such as accounting, project management, or payroll, automating these processes can save a lot of time.

Table of Contents

In this article, we will explain the following:

Enabling Scripts & Macros

How to Create a Macro in Excel

Specific Example of a Macro

Learn More About VBA

Create a Button to Get Started with VBA

Add Code to Give the Button Functionality

Did it Work?

Enabling Scripts & Macros

Before you can create macros or VBA scripts in Excel, you must enable the Developer tab on the Ribbon menu. The Developer tab is not enabled by default. To enable it:

Put a tick in the box next to Developer.

Make sure the document is from a trusted source if you are working on a shared project in Excel and other Microsoft programs.

When you are done using your scripts and macros, disable all macros to prevent potentially malicious code from infecting other documents.

Create a Macro in Excel

All the actions you take in Excel while recording a macro are added to it. 

Enter a Macro name, a Shortcut key, and a Description. Macro names must begin with a letter and can’t have any spaces. The shortcut key must be a letter.

Decide where you want to store the macro from the following options:

Personal Macro Workbook: This will create a hidden Excel document with stored macros to be used with any Excel documents.

New Workbook: Will create a new Excel document to store the created macros.

This Workbook: This will only be applied to the document you are currently editing.

Specific Example Of a Macro

You can manually change this. Or you can create a program using a macro to automatically format it correctly for you.

Record The Macro

This will highlight the cells that have a balance due. We added a few customers with no balance due to further illustrate the formatting.  

Apply The Macro

When you run a macro, all the formatting is done for you. This macro we just created is stored in the Visual Basic Editor.

Users can run macros in several different ways. Read Run a macro to learn more.  

Learn More About VBA

The code you see in the box above is what was created when you recorded your macro. 

Create a Button To Get Started With VBA

To insert a button element, navigate to the Developer tab. 

Select ActiveX Command Button from the dropdown next to Insert in the Controls section.

Add Code To Give The Button Functionality

VBA coding doesn’t take place in the Excel interface. It is done in a separate environment.  

Go to the Developer tab and make sure Design Mode is active.

Looking at the code in the screenshot below, notice the beginning (Private Sub) and end (End Sub) of the code is already there.

The code below will drive the currency conversion procedure.

ActiveCell.Value = (ActiveCell * 1.28)

The screenshot below shows you how the code looks in the VBA window after you insert it .

Did It Work?

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